DHI Leadership Development Xperience (LDX)

This week’s blog post was written by Doug Laflamme with Smoot Associates, our sales representatives in the Massachusets, New Hampshire area about his experience at the DHI Leadership Development Xperience.

A month ago, I had the chance to attend the DHI Leadership Development Xperience held at DHI headquarters in Chantilly, Virginia.  At the time I was not sure what to expect, but I thought it would be a good experience for me being so new to the industry.  Thankfully my place of work is very supportive of DHI and allowed me to take the time to go (Thanks Bill).

Photo courtesy of DHI

The conference was filled with things I expected such as helpful insight on the future of DHI, new credentials and resources, and group brainstorming sessions.  LDX also opened our minds to things I was not expecting, things like how we can increase members in our chapter and where we as members could take the new DHI. LDX was full of ideas, and activities to help us think outside the box when it comes to how our chapters could be run, as well as videos, plans and collaborative thinking about leadership, things that make a great leader and how to become one of those leaders.  It also taught us that there is no right or wrong way to run our chapter and its ok to run our chapters differently than it has been run in the past.

Perhaps the most important and overlooked portion of the conference that I did not realize before I went on this trip is all the great people I would be able to meet and the relationships with those people I was able to build.  It was great to meet people in our industry from other parts of the country, put faces to names, as well learn a little more about the people I interact with through emails so often.  I also got to spend some time with my chapters DHI President Jim White and get to know him better as well.  This was the part of LDX that was most important to me.  I believe the relationships we build in this industry to invaluable.

Photo courtesy of DHI

The DHI Leadership Development Xperience was a truly great experience that left us invigorated with new ideas and fresh wind in our sails ready to take back to our local chapter.  I would recommend the DHI Leadership conference to anyone who has the opportunity to attend.

Thanks, Doug for sharing your experience! Hager Companies has had a corporate membership with DHI for decades and our President and COO, Josh Hager, currently sits on the Board of Governors.

 

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Concave vs. Convex Wall Stops

Wall and floor stops are inexpensive products that, when installed correctly, can help prevent damage to a wall, lockset or door. If a door is forcefully pushed open, a stop is meant to protect the wall from being gouged by the door or lockset, and it will also protect the door hardware from being damaged by a quick meeting with the wall.

 

Wall and floor stops come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes and can be mounted on the wall or on the floor behind the door.  For this post, we are going to focus on concave and convex wall stops.

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The DSSF / Hager Companies Scholarship Winner!

We have always felt educating the next generation is an important aspect of our business and industry. Offering continuing education to our team members through the Door and Hardware Institute (DHI), the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), among other organizations on key programs related to safety and security issues is another key step.

DHI’s Safety & Security Foundation (DSSF) also encourages and attracts new talent to the industry and gives them the training, tools and education to help them be successful. It was an easy decision to partner with the Foundation and establish the Hager Companies Scholarship.

This year we congratulate Alison Nugent, a senior detailer with DH Pace in Olathe, Kansas as the winner of the Hager Companies Scholarship! Alison answered a few questions DHI put forth to all the winners in November’s issue of Doors + Hardware Magazine and we wanted to share her responses here.

How did you get started in the door and hardware industry?
I returned from a summer internship in the United Kingdom and was looking for a full-time position.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
I enjoy providing a service that helps create functional buildings that meet the needs of people who use them every day. While the industry can be challenging, I enjoy being a technical resource for architects and general contractors.

How do you de-stress?
I de-stress by cleaning and organizing things. I also enjoy exercising and playing sports.

If you weren’t a door security and safety professional, what would you be?
I would work in a position in the sports industry. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I am a big sports fan.

Who is your mentor/hero?
My mentor was my late co-worker Steve Holden. Steve had over 30 years’ experience in this industry and was full of knowledge. He was an incredible resource and person and I am thankful for everything he taught me.

What is your advice to someone considering taking DHI technical education?
The DHI technical education is a big commitment, but worth the effort. While it can seem overwhelming, focus on completing one class at a time. That has helped me stay motivated to achieve my overall goal.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Something that my family, friends, teachers and co-workers have all shared: Do not be afraid to ask questions.” Asking questions demonstrates a desire to learn and grow. I have learned a lot by asking questions and will continue to do that throughout my career.

Congratulations and wishing you continued success Alison! You can read about all the winners on DSSF website here.

 

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Lubricants

During a cold snap, when temperatures dropped below freezing, the deadbolt to my garage froze and the key wouldn’t turn. I was renting at the time so I called the property maintenance company who told me to use a hair dryer to unfreeze the lock, so I could get to work. Then the person added “I’ll send someone out to spray it with WD-40.”

Being in the hardware business we hear and learn new things every day. One of the things I learn early on is while WD-40 is good for a lot of uses, it isn’t good to spray in locks.

Our Director of Engineering, Mark McRae, wrote a White Paper on the subject, which we have shared below. There is a lot of good technical information but basically our Director of Engineering recommends using White Lithium Grease for hinges, locks, and other door hardware.

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The WD-40 vs White Lithium Grease vs Silicon Spray by Mark McRae
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From getting loose a stuck bolt to lubricating metal to metal and metal to non-metal friction areas.

There are a lot of oils/lubricants/greases available for specific purposes and some that will work for a wide range of applications.

Below is information on WD-40, Silicon Spray and White Lithium Grease as they are by far the most popular “multipurpose” lubricant/greases.

WD-40

WD-40 (Water Displacement, 40th attempt) is a product that everyone uses indiscriminately on a wide range of materials.

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Closer Installation

Hager team members have an affliction.  I’ve heard that other people in the door and hardware industry also have it. When we are out and about in the world we constantly stop and look at door openings. We look to see if the correct hardware is on the door for the application. We also check to see if the hardware has been installed correctly. This affliction can be a quick flick of the eye or a full stop and spend 15 minutes (or longer) examining the door opening.  If you are a friend or family member of a door and hardware professional surely you have been detained by your loved one for this reason. Take pity on them, he or she can’t help it.

This affliction hit our Director of Marketing and Product Development, Bob Wilkins, when he visited his neighborhood deli.  First Bob spotted the closer arm that had ripped out of the door frame.

 

Closer_Arm

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Project Profile: International Training Center (Phase V)

Project Profile:             International Training Center (Phase V)

Client:                            United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America

Architect:                       Carlile Coatsworth Architects

General Contractor:     Penta Building Group

Distributor:                    Hallgren – Las Vegas

Installers:                       American Door Installation

Door Openings:            200

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (UBC) maintains its International Training Center (ITC) in Las Vegas, Nevada. With the completion of Phase V this campus consists of nearly a million square feet. At the core of this facility are the training areas that will keep union carpenters skills up to date with emerging technology.

Phase V comprises a 223,000 square feet building which houses 30 classrooms, a working shop, ballrooms and a museum/lobby area. There are over two dozen custom display cases dispersed throughout the lobby full of historic UBC artifacts. More …

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National Sales Meeting

Every year the domestic sales team unites in St. Louis for strategy and training sessions. We are passionate about making sure our sales representatives have the most up to date training for our products in order to be able to fully assist our customers.

Our training manager, Jana Carlisle-Napier, along with input from the VP of Domestic Sales and Regional Sales Managers organizes an intense 2 days of instructional sessions. The Engineering Department also pitches in and creates real jobsite scenarios with common and uncommon hardware issues so everyone can have hands on experience.

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Education and Training

Is one of your New Year’s Resolutions pursuing additional continuing education?

We can make it easy for you to check that off your list! Here at Hager Companies we believe the more informed our customers are about door openings, codes and our products the more successful a project will be.

That is why we offer training for pretty much everyone in the building industry. From architects, specifiers, distributors, physical plant maintenance personnel to end users or we can create a training session specifically for your team.

These education sessions can be held at your office so you don’t have to worry about completing those pesky travel reports.

 

Or, if you would like to set up training at a central location in order that several of your personnel from different branches can attend we can do that too.

 

 

We also have a National Sales & Product Training Manager who travels the United States sharing her 20 year knowledge about the industry.

 

 

Several of our educational sessions are AIA accredited. Below is just a small sample of the sessions we offer. For a complete list click here.

 

 

Give your local sales representative a call to learn more.

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Lock Function Chart

We are in the process of uploading a BHMA lock function chart to our website to make it easy to quickly match what lock function is being specified to our Grade 1, Grade 2 & Grade 3 locksets. This chart will be able to be found under Resources / Product Information / Locks.

Founded in 1925, as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (BHMA) role has been developing standards for the wide range (and getting wider) of builders hardware. There are three levels of grades for locksets based on the number of cycles an owner can expect the product to withstand. Grade 1 is the heaviest duty, passing 2,500,000 cycles while Grade 3 passes just 350,000 cycles. The price difference between Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 varies and may present an occasion to save the owner money on a project. Specifying a Grade 1 lock on a main entry office door is highly recommended but there is opportunity to save dollars by utilizing a Grade 2 lock on a door opening used less frequently, like a closet door. That said it is important not to undersize the lock grade on a door opening in order to save money as it could cost more in repairs in the future. More …

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