Safe Schools Week October 21-27, 2018

Every week is safe schools week in our book, but in1984 the National School Safety Center (NSSC) designated a special week to recognize the successes of quintessential school, district, state, and national programs.

Per the NSSC website, the goal of this campaign is to “motivate key education and law enforcement policymakers, as well as students, parents and community residents, to vigorously advocate school safety. School safety includes keeping campuses free from crime and violence, improving discipline, and increasing student attendance.”

Doors, with the correct hardware, play an essential role in providing safety and security to students, teachers, and personnel. Have you ever thought about how many doors you walk through when you enter a school? Was there an open gate when you entered the campus? Was the building’s perimeter door unlocked, so you were able to walk right in? How many doors did you pass before you reached the office?  Recently constructed schools are designed to direct the flow of visitors to help control access to the campus. Often, older schools were built to be more accessible, allowing opportunities for non-authorized people to enter freely, without having visitors check-in.

More …

RSS Feed

Fuzzy Credentials

A sales representative was in a customer’s office recently with our 34K Series Standalone lock. The customer was reviewing the brochure when he noted one of the additional features was a “fuzzy credential entry available” and asked what it was.

It’s a good question and the answer may help dispell the image that just popped into your head from hearing the term fuzzy credential.

More …

RSS Feed

DHI ConNextions 2018 – Booth 319

Next week, several members of the Hager Family and team members will head to Baltimore for the annual DHI ConNextions show.

For the Hager team, this show is all about connecting with our customers.  We want to hear what’s new in their lives and businesses; collaborate our efforts in order to grow their sales; and, of course, showcase our new products. In the last year, we’ve released the following products:

We will also have demonstrations with our HS4 Electronic Access Control products including the newest communication platform BLUEnet. We are especially excited by BLUEnet’s ability to provide a real-time (within 4 seconds) lock communication, keeping people safer in an active shooter situation.

 

If you’d like to attend the show but haven’t purchased a pass yet, we have complimentary VIP Exhibit Hall Passes available. Just click on this link and in the Promo Code box type hagevip.

We look forward to seeing you!


 

 

RSS Feed

School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

More …

RSS Feed

Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

More …

RSS Feed

Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark

This article was published in the August edition of the DHI Door + Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with permission.

Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark, by Ginny Powell

Tucked into the “All American City” of Lakeland, Florida, is not just a community, but the realization of a dream initiated by a small group of parents nearly 20 years ago. It’s called The Village at Noah’s Landing.

Nearly two decades ago, a small group of parents of adult children with special needs met while watching their children take part in sporting activities. They began talking with each other about what would happen to their kids if they were no longer around. Who would oversee their care?

Their worries were further reinforced when they discovered that the options for care in and around Lakeland were extremely limited. But instead of becoming defeated, these five sets of parents took action. Big action. In 1997, they created Noah’s Ark of Central Florida.

The first homes were built between 2002 and 2007 and are located near downtown Lakeland. Called Noah’s Nest, this clustering of four houses is home to 17 residents living independently with the support of their fellow residents, family, and friends.

Noah June 2016 -10

A Dream of Building a Community
While Noah’s Nest was a great start, the dream was always to build a bigger community for adults with developmental disabilities. The Villages of Noah’s Landing, with Phase 1 scheduled to open later this summer, is precisely that.

Phase 1 can accommodate up to 132 developmentally disabled residents and only takes up a fraction of the property’s 62 acres. When all phases are complete, the community will offer a wide selection of social, recreational, educational and vocational choices, and provide for the health care needs of its residents.

More …

RSS Feed

Classroom Barricade Devices and why focusing on them makes us vulnerable to threats

There has been a lot of information written about classroom barricade devices. We have been watching this subject closely and are dismayed to see states overriding State, Federal and International Building Codes by allowing barricade devices. Ohio, sadly, has lead the charge. There isn’t a simple or quick solution to this issue but our goal is to remind parents, students, teachers and politicians to look at the whole picture and use their building code officials and the door and hardware industry as expert sources.

The article below was written by Lt. Joe Hendry, CLEE who is a 26 year veteran of the Kent State Police Department. He serves as an Intelligence Liaison Officer for the Ohio Department of Homeland Security and has been named a subject matter expert by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office for active threat response. Lt. Hendry holds a bachelor’s degree in telecommunications and served honorably in the United States Marine Corps. He is a trained crisis intervention team officer in mental health. He is an instructor in solo-engagement tactics, active shooter response, preventing and responding to suicide bombing incidents and tactical chemical weapons. He is a national instructor the the ALICE Training Institute and has trained staff and students, and consulted on security plans for pre-school, K-12, universities, hospitals, libraries, MRDD facilities, business and industry. In other words he is an expert.

This article appeared in the October edition of DHI Doors and Hardware Magazine. Lt. Hendry has graciously allowed us to reprint his article in order to help continue the education on this emotional subject.
******

The first time I ever observed a secondary locking device, it was at the State Fire Marshal’s Academy in Ohio. I was teaching an ALICE Instructor course, and a student in the class brought a device he had made to help secure a door. During a break, he demonstrated the device, and yes, it did what he said – it secured the door using the bottom of the door and the wall.

It had a few steps to install, and at the time, with Sandy Hook only four months in the rear view mirror, looked to be an impressive device. Several educators and law enforcement officers in the class remarked that they liked the device. I was non-committal but felt it might bear looking into given the concept failure of lockdown in the building breach at Sandy Hook. Looking back, the irony of the device, the location, and my naiveté has not been lost on me.

During the past two years, I have learned more about codes, doors, locks and devices than I ever thought I would need to know as a police officer. Learning the reason behind code development, door and lock manufacturing, visual communication design, and tactical civilian and law enforcement response to threats has become a way of life. As a law enforcement expert in the field of active threat response, I’m repeatedly asked for recommendations on what secondary locking device to purchase for buildings. My original thought of, “These might be the answer to our prayers,” to, “These may be the worst idea we have ever had,” evolved as I studied and learned.

More …

RSS Feed

National Safety Month – Part IV

June is National Safety Month and we have heard from Ed Dyling, Jennifer Scott and Edward Robinson about why they choose safety. Now we hear from Tina Williamson who is Hager’s Safety/Environmental Supervisor in our Montgomery plant. 

“As we come to the end of National Safety Month, we reflect on what it really means to be safe. Our campaign of Safety by Choice, Not by Chance was used to entice employees to think about how they make decisions; do those decisions include being safe or are they careless acts that they have always done, but just haven’t been injured doing them yet.”

“We encounter unsafe conditions every day. We drive to work every day and are faced with unsafe conditions; other drivers driving reckless, weather conditions, etc. It’s the unsafe acts we introduce with those unsafe conditions that cause injuries. For example, a thunderstorm is an unsafe condition. If we are driving during a thunderstorm and are speeding and don’t allow a safe stopping distance between the cars in front of us, we have introduced two unsafe acts in an unsafe condition. The chances of being injured are increased because of our unsafe acts. We become complacent because we’ve done it before and haven’t been injured. An accident can occur in a split second and the consequences can be devastating.”

“As you go through your work week and even when you are at home think about what you are doing that is unsafe. Are you being complacent? Do you think it can’t happen to you? It can happen to any one of us. Just remember, someone is counting on you. Make safe decisions, if not for you, for those you love.”

Thank you to Tina and the Hager team members who graciously participated in this month’s National Safety Month campaign. We hope these stories convey our commitment to safety for our employees and encourage you to also choose safety.

RSS Feed

June is National Safety Month – Part III

This is Part III of our contribution to National Safety Month.

With manufacturing and distribution facilities located around the world we are aware of the potential safety risks to our employees. We diligently work to minimize those risks with employee training and safety meetings, including programs like Safety by Choice, Not by Chance.

Edward Robinson is a Warehouse Worker who began working at Hager’s Montgomery Distribution Center in 2006. He transferred to our Phoenix facility in 2010.  Edward’s job duties include receiving, stocking, replenishment, picking, shipping and itemizing. 

Here is why Edward feels Safety by Choice, Not by Chance is important:

 
Safety by Choice Not by Chance is important to me because I’m a
 motorcycle rider in a state that you wear a helmet by choice. It’s my
 choice to wear my helmet and be as safe as possible. I had an
 accident and if it wasn’t my choice to be safe and wear a helmet
 I probably wouldn’t be here today, so safety by choice is very
  important to me. It may have just saved my life!”

We are happy you wore your motorcycle helmet too Edward! Thanks for making safety your choice!

RSS Feed

June is National Safety Month – Part II

June is National Safety Month – Part II

We are continuing our Safety by Choice, Not by Chance series. 

This week we are introducing you to Jennifer Scott. Jennifer began working at the Hager Distribution Center in Montgomery, Alabama as a temporary employee. In December of 2014 we were lucky to have her join us full time. As the administration assistant Jennifer wears many hats, from completing paperwork, processing orders, shipping small parcels and shipping LTL. She does whatever it takes to get the job done.

Jennifer shares why she participates in Safety by Choice, not by Chance:

“I choose to work in a safe manner by always being aware of my surroundings, understanding my limitations and asking for assistance when needed. This is important to me because I am blessed with a loving family and wonderful friends.” 

There are some jobs we think are inherently dangerous. Remember the photo of the steel workers having lunch on a steel beam high above the ground? Now steel workers are required to wear fall protection as safety precautions.

Working in an office can have dangers also. Trip hazards or lifting a 50 lb. case of copy paper incorrectly (or at all) as examples. We are glad to have Jennifer on board and appreciate she makes safety a choice!

RSS Feed