Classroom Barricade Devices

Over the past few weeks, there have been numerous news articles from across the country referencing school security initiatives and several discussed the use of classroom barricade devices. As a door hardware manufacturer, this is concerning because these types of devices often do not meet life safety or fire codes requiring free egress, fire protection, or ADA accessibility.

In March of this year, the Bremen Public School District, located in Indiana, developed a new school safety initiative plan. Several levels of security are being added, including upgrading their card access system. Unfortunately, in the article that reported these upgrades, it stated “the safety plan also includes the addition of a classroom barricade device. The devices are magnetic and slide onto the back piece of the door to barricade the door and keep intruders from entering a classroom if they break the lock. The devices are already being distributed to classrooms.”¹

In 2018, the State of Indiana released a School Safety Recommendations document which specifically included verbiage on classroom door hardware.

Under Recommendation #11
“Replace classroom door hardware to ensure fire and building code compliance. The door must lock from the inside and not restrict exiting or egress from the classroom or building. This could reduce the number of non-compliant tactics being used (such as magnets) to allow easier re-entry access by students during class time.”²

Another recent news article described how a former lecturer at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln began to discuss procedures to be followed in the event of an active shooter situation. However, before the lecturer began speaking, he noticed that the classroom doors did not have locks on the inside of the doors.

Concerned, the lecturer did reach out to the University’s Facilities Service advising them of this safety concern and suggestions on how to fix it, including the use of deadbolts. The article went on to share that the concerns were forward to the UNL’s Police Department’s Assistant Chief of Police, who in turn, did reply that deadbolts were not a viable solution as “fire code prohibits the use of deadbolts in classroom spaces.”³ Listening to officials who understand building and life safety codes is vital in having code-compliant hardware.

The 2018 edition of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) notes in Chapter 15 for Existing Education Occupancies:

15.2.2.4 Classroom Door Locking to Prevent Unwanted Entry
Classroom doors shall be permitted to be locked to prevent unwanted entry provided that the locking means is approved and all the following conditions are met:

  1. The locking means shall be capable of being engaged without opening the door.
  2. The unlocking and unlatching from the classroom side of the door can be accomplished without the use of a key, tool, or special knowledge or effort.
  3. The releasing mechanism for unlocking and unlatching shall be located at a height not less than 34 in. *865 mm) and not exceeding 48 in. (1220 mm) above the finished floor.
  4. Locks, if remotely engaged, shall be unlockable from the classroom side of the door without the use of a key, tool, or special knowledge or effort.
  5. The door shall be capable of being unlocked and opened from outside the room with the necessary key or other credentials.
  6. The locking means shall not modify the door closer, panic hardware, or fire exit hardware.
  7. Modifications to the fire door assemblies, including door hardware, shall be in accordance with NFPA 80.
  8. The emergency action plan, required by 15.7.1, shall address the use of the locking and unlocking means from within and outside the room.
  9. Staff shall be drilled in the engagement and release of the locking means, from within and outside the room, as part of the emergency egress drills required by 15.7.2.

The Bremen School District disregarded NFPA Life Safety Code and their own state’s recommendations. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s assistant police chief was correct in noting deadbolts would not meet code, however the article didn’t share any further information whether solutions were provided for locking the interior side of the classroom doors.

In Massachusetts, a lawsuit was recently filed by the Lenox Public School District (near Boston) against the town of Lenox, the Massachusetts Building Code Appeals Board, and the local building inspector for requiring the school to remove the barricades devices they purchased as they do not meet Life Safety or Fire codes.

With the advent of social media and the 24/7 news cycle, information and misinformation are difficult to categorize or research. Many educators and the public may not understand the challenges classroom barricade devices present.

Selecting proper security for emergency egress, while meeting building codes can be challenging. It is important to remember that building codes are in place for a reason. The NFPA gathered statistics on school fires with 10 or more deaths. The last major school fire happened in 1958 in Chicago, IL, where ninety students and three nuns lost their lives during a fire at the Our Lady of the Angels School. We all can agree that keeping our children safe is our number one priority.

After each major incident, we learn how to better improve buildings to keep people safer. Following the Columbine tragedy that happened 20 years ago on April 20th, a new lock function was introduced called the intruder classroom function, that allows mechanical control of the outside lever via a key from either the interior and exterior side of the door. A standard classroom function lock is controlled by a key in the outside cylinder, which locks or unlocks the outside lever. The intruder classroom function allows a person to lock the door with a key from inside the room rather than stepping out into the hallway. Today, there are many more code-compliant options available.

The Door Security + Safety Foundation has gathered many resources for how to combine safety and security on their Lock Don’t Block website. These include articles, white papers, and other documents from organizations such as Safe and Sound Schools, Pass – Partner Alliance for Safer Schools, The School Superintendent Association, and the National Association of State Fire Marshals, among others.

The advancement of technology has introduced several electronic access control solutions. Online locks no longer need to be hardwired making installation easier and less expensive. Obviously, we feel our HS4 electronic hardware solution is the best, but our hope is to educate school districts, parents, and facility maintenance personnel that there is cost-effective code-compliant hardware available. We do not feel barricade devices are an acceptable solution for school security, due to possible unintended consequences.  We can help you design a safe school security system that meets building and life safety codes.

For more information on our HS4 Hager powered by Salto Electronic Access Control Solutions please contact your local sales representative or email [email protected] .

¹ Indiana District Develops School Safety Initiative Plan 
² 2018 Indiana School Safety Recommendations
³ The Gray Area of Classroom Locks

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Product Announcements

We’ve had a busy first quarter and we wanted to share our most recent product announcements in case you missed any!

January 8, 2018 – 3300 Series Grade 3
We added the 3300 Series Grade 3 tubular leverset to our lock line. Offered in four functions – passage, privacy, entry and single dummy, along with five finishes: US3, US10B, US15, US26, US26D. It’s field reversible with a thru-bolt design for ease of installation. This Grade 3 lock provides a perfect solution for multi-family and assisted living facilities when suiting with Grade 1 and Grade 2 products.

 

 

More …

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New Catalog Release

Our new catalog is out!  If you have requested a catalog in the last few months and haven’t received it yet, you should be shortly. In the meantime, we did upload a file to our website, both complete and in sections.

Here is a link to the catalog on our website –Hager Catalog

Cover

 

If you’re new to Hager or the door hardware industry the general information in front of the hinge section. has great tips. You can find information on ANSI, how many hinges are needed to support a different weighted doors, security features, and specialty hinges.  Did you know we have two different styles of cover channels for our Roton continuous hinges? Click here to learn more.

Did you know we have two different styles of cover channels for our Roton continuous hinges? Click here to find out more.

Of course, we aren’t just a hinge company. You can find information on our  locks, exit devices, and closers by clicking each product line name.

A couple of new products we’ve released in the last few months in our exit device line include a flush end cap and photoluminescent push bar cover option. You can learn more about these products by reading our blog post.

We know you’ll take some time to familiarize yourself with all the great information found in our new catalog. Of course, you can always call your local sales representative or our customer service department for more info.

Have a great day and thanks for your support!!

 

 

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CONSTRUCT + CSI

This time next week several of our team members will be making their way to Austin, Texas for CONSTRUCT.  If you haven’t registered yet, there is still time.  If you’re on the fence we wrote about the benefits a few weeks ago which you can read here.

CONSTRUCT 2016 Austin Booth 516
Stop by Booth 516 and say hello to our team:

Adam Bucko      Western Regional Sales Mgr
Debra Powers    Architectural Rep for TX & OK
Ken Kimutis      Kimutis/Chisum, local Sales Reps
Will Chisum      Kimutis/Chisum, local Sales Reps
Brian Clarke     Dir. Arch Specs & Tech Support
John Cohrs       Sr Architectural Spec Writer
Bob Wilkins      Dir. of Marketing & Product Dev
Ginny Powell    Digital Marketing Specialist

If you work in the St. Louis area and are looking for a local CSI chapter, the Continuing Education Programs was just published by the Greater St. Louis CSI chapter.  Besides continuing education credits with programs like Design Guidelines for the Visual Environment and Sustainability in Construction Administration, there will also be a tour of the Arch River Grounds on October 19th. Of course, the annual Golf Classic, being held on September 21st, is always a fun time. Find out more information on the Greater St. Louis CSI Chapter’s new website here.

As you can see Hager is committed to the mission of CSI. We work hard to make sure our specifications are clear, concise and fair. Our goal is to provide door hardware that meets code while supporting the architect and end user in their goal of a safe and secure building.

We hope to see you next week!

 

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Lubricants

During a cold snap, when temperatures dropped below freezing, the deadbolt to my garage froze and the key wouldn’t turn. I was renting at the time so I called the property maintenance company who told me to use a hair dryer to unfreeze the lock, so I could get to work. Then the person added “I’ll send someone out to spray it with WD-40.”

Being in the hardware business we hear and learn new things every day. One of the things I learn early on is while WD-40 is good for a lot of uses, it isn’t good to spray in locks.

Our Director of Engineering, Mark McRae, wrote a White Paper on the subject, which we have shared below. There is a lot of good technical information but basically our Director of Engineering recommends using White Lithium Grease for hinges, locks, and other door hardware.

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The WD-40 vs White Lithium Grease vs Silicon Spray by Mark McRae
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From getting loose a stuck bolt to lubricating metal to metal and metal to non-metal friction areas.

There are a lot of oils/lubricants/greases available for specific purposes and some that will work for a wide range of applications.

Below is information on WD-40, Silicon Spray and White Lithium Grease as they are by far the most popular “multipurpose” lubricant/greases.

WD-40

WD-40 (Water Displacement, 40th attempt) is a product that everyone uses indiscriminately on a wide range of materials.

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Project Profile: University Place at West Virginia University

Having a safe and comfortable living space is important all the time but never more so than when a person moves away from home for the first time. Often, that first time happens when kids are off to college.

Architect:                   Grimm + Parker
Developer:                 Paradigm Development Group LLC
General Contractor:   Turner Construction
Distributor:                 A. G. Mauro Company
Door Openings:         300
Project Dollar Value:  $70,000,000

photo by Grimm + Parker

The team above hit all the highlights when they designed and built University Place, a student housing community near West Virginia University.

Hager Co put together a comprehensive commercial hardware package that included standard and heavy duty products to match the door use frequency and kept within budget. More …

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National Facilities Management and Technology (NFMT) Conference and Expo – 2015

Earlier this month we exhibited at the NFMT Conference in Baltimore. Most of the attendees are facility maintenance personnel who use and maintain our products on a daily basis. The information we get back from this show is extremely valuable to us.

Some think trade shows are out of touch – and that may be true in some cases – but not for NFMT. We will be back next year!

Here are a few photos from the show.

Love that NFMT was all over Social Media!

More …

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Grand Egyptian Museum – Cairo

We are excited and honored to be part of the Grand Egyptian Museum Project in Cairo.

The Grand Egyptian Museum project is being billed as one of the largest museum projects currently being built in the world. Hill International and EHAF Consulting Engineers were awarded the project in 2010. Other participants include Heneghan Peng Architects, Ove Arup and Buro Happold.

Just over a mile away from the famed Giza pyramids and adjacent to the Giza plateau this museum will combine the past and present of Cairo. Over 100,000 artifacts will be housed in a large exhibition area and there will be several outlying buildings that will include a conference center and restaurants. One of the main design elements will be the Menkaurus Retaining Wall that will face the pyramids.

Egybrit, located in Cairo, is the distributor handling the project and they will be sending photos periodically as the project advances. Egybrit has been a loyal Hager distributor for many years and has completed some of the largest projects in Egypt, including Wadi el Nil Hospital, which was the first major project to use the Hager H1/H2/H3 keyways.

The first stage of the museum is scheduled to open in August of 2015.

 

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Lockset Grades

Founded in 1925 as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, now the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association, BHMA took a leadership role in developing standards for builder’s hardware to ensure quality and performance. Hager Companies has been a member for many years.

Hardware is a key element in buildings as door openings provide means of egress, security and building accessibility for people with physical disabilities. BHMA developed a minimum performance grading system for all hardware including lockets. This grading system is also accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), a private, non-profit organization that coordinates the voluntary standardization in developing and maintaining performance standards for builder’s hardware. More …

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Decorative Design Levers

How many times have you found the perfect lever style you wanted to use throughout your project only to find it isn’t offered on the different lock types the job requires?

We are excited to announce five new decorative lever styles available on our 2300 tubular lock and 3800 mortise lock series. This will be helpful on multi-family projects where a strong lock is needed to secure the front door but interior doors may not need the same security, which can save money. More …

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