Team Member Profile – Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT – Manager, Architectural Specification Consultants

Sheryl Simon has been with Hager Companies for 13 years and was recently promoted to Manager, Architectural Specifications Consultants. We sat down with Sheryl to ask her a few questions.

Sheryl Simon at one of the many CSI STL events she volunteers for. Sheryl currently is 2nd VP for the chapter. Photo credit: George Everding

Childhood AmbitionI was always interested in design. (I’m not sure if it’s an ambition or an obsession.) Even as a young child I was always re-arranging the furniture. My parents never knew what to expect when they came home. 

First JobWorking at a very busy ice cream stand. The lines seemed to never end but it was fun interacting with all the customers. 

What led you to the hardware industry: I married into it and very quickly became a hardware geek. 

Proudest professional momentWhen I passed my CDT. It is a very difficult exam and required a lot of studying. 

 

Sheryl Simon and August Hager – Jobsite visit at Ballpark Village

Biggest challengeMy biggest challenge today is keeping up with technology, particularly the advances in electronic access control. 

Guilty pleasureChocolate and home decor stores.

Favorite book/movieMy favorite movie is “It’s a Wonderful Life”. It reminds me that our life’s most important work is often work we never planned to do. 

 

Sheryl sharing her knowledge at the inaugural Young Professionals Day tour in 2015 at CSI CONSTRUCT – St. Louis

Mentor/heroI have had many mentors over the years and I am thankful for all of them. 

Best advice you ever received: When one door closes another one opens. It’s a pun on the industry but very appropriate. 

Sheryl receiving congratulations for her Hager Companies 10-year anniversary

Best advise you never receivedTrust your instincts.

What advice you would share with someone entering this industry:  The construction industry is one of the most exciting and diverse industries. It is forever changing so never stop learning and be receptive to change. If it’s something you want to pursue go for it! I’m glad I did. 

—–

We reached out to a few of Sheryl’s colleagues and this is what they had to say.

“Sheryl is the go-to person for many architects and this can be contributed to her attention to detail and the fact she genuinely cares about the specification process and everyone involved in it. Sheryl is determined to hold herself to a higher standard and expects more from herself than others expect from her. Being meticulous and keeping information organized allows Sheryl to provide the very best service to her clients. She also has a wonderful outlook on life and somehow always finds something to laugh about, even when things may be going a bit sideways.”
Brian Clarke, AHC, DHT, DHC, FDAI, AAADM, CDT, CSI – Director, Architectural Specifications & Technical Support

From the Two Twelve Clayton Case Study
“This project was interesting to me because I’d never done a high-rise project before, and I learned a lot through the process. Stair towers in a 26-story building are much different than they are in a four-story office building and they require different types of hardware. Sheryl got into the details with me to help me understand what was needed and why. As architects, we wanted to make the doors as ‘invisible’ as possible. We worked with Sheryl on concepts to design doors that functioned to satisfy code requirements, yet were the least disruptive to the design.”
Josh Goodman, AIA, Director of Operations, HDA Architects

 

If you’re located in the Midwest and need help with specifications, door submittals or would like to schedule a lunch and learn, please contact Sheryl at [email protected] 

RSS Feed

Why is the Bottom Rod Missing?

Have you ever come across a pair of doors that have just a top vertical rod exit device and not top and bottom, and wondered why? Often an architect or specification writer will specify “less bottom rod (LBR)” on pairs of doors, especially in healthcare facilities.

This photo was taken in an assisted living facility here in St. Louis. This opening is a pair of fire rated corridor doors which means they must positively latch in case of a fire to control flames and smoke from traveling through the facility. Without latching hardware on the exit device itself, positive latching is accomplished with the surface mounted top vertical rod. As you can see from the picture, the door is being held open with a magnetic hold open tied into the fire alarm. If the fire alarm is activated the hold open will release the door. The door closer will swing the door shut and the top vertical rod will latch the door.

This leads us to the question of why the architect or specification writer specified LBR. While the top and bottom vertical rods help secure the door, the bottom vertical rod is secured to a floor strike mounted in the floor. That floor strike can become a tripping hazard to people that use mobility devices, such as canes, walkers, crutches, and wheelchairs. ADA regulation 404.2.10, Door and Gate Surfaces, states: “Swing door and gate surfaces within 10 inches (255mm) of the finish floor or ground measured vertically shall have a smooth surface on the push side extending the full width of the door or gate.” The regulation goes on to specify how thick protection plates and installation screws can be.

This installation is a textbook example of the intersection of fire code and ADA regulations. The goal is to keep people safe both from fire and tripping. When architects and door hardware professionals work together, the result can be a safe, attractive and code compliant facility.

For assistance in writing door hardware specifications please contact Brian Clarke at [email protected]. For information regarding our products please contact our customer service team at 800-255-3590 or your local sales representative.

RSS Feed

Congratulations Are in Order

DHI Door Security + Safety Magazine recently announced the winners of the Robert G. Ryan Awards.  The awards are presented to the best volunteer authors of articles appearing in the previous calendar year in the magazine and cover both technical and business-related topics.

Two team members won in the category of – Feature and Business Article.

First place went to Brian Clarke, DHT, AHC, DHC, CFDAI for his article Securing Schools: Solutions Trends in Educational Facilities from the June 2017 DSS magazine issue.  Brian also received the Recognition of Outstanding Service and Involvement (ROSI) award and celebrated 5 years as a DHI instructor.

Second place went to Dan White for his article The Gravity of Mentorship from the September 2017 DSS magazine issue.

We are very proud of Brian and Dan and appreciate their dedication and commitment, not only to Hager but to the door and hardware industry.

 

RSS Feed

Friday Fun

At Hager, we are passionate about door hardware. It’s one of the reasons we added locks, exit devices, and door controls to our product line several years ago.  Last year we partnered with Salto Systems to create our Hager powered by Salto electronic access control line. Our goal is to provide our customers with the products, service, knowledge, and partnership to elevate the value they bring to the channel.

Yet, we can’t forget our history so today we are going to throw it back a few decades with a light-hearted post.

These cartoons were created from the “inspired pens of America’s most famous cartoonists” – Tom Henderson, Virgil Partch, Lichty, Irwin Caplan, and Larry Reynolds in 1952 for our “Everything Hinges on Hager” campaign.  Let us know if any resonate with you!

Monday was Labor Day which marked the official end of summer, but there is still time to get out and enjoy the sun (make sure to lather up with sunscreen!).

More …

RSS Feed

Locking Down School Safety and Access Control by Gordon Holmes

This article appears in the July issue of the DHI Security + Safety Magazine and is reprinted here with their permission.

Locking Down School Safety and Access Control

According to a recent CNN article, In the first 20 weeks of 2018 there have been 22 school shootings where someone was hurt or killed.  This averages out to more than one shooting a week, so it’s no surprise that school security is a growing focus of today’s world.

Since 1999 when the Columbine shooting happened, towns such as Sandy Hook, Connecticut, Blacksburg, Virginia, and more recently Parkland, Florida -are forever etched in our minds because of the senseless violence that occurred there. While we recognize we cannot entirely prevent violence, campuses across America are learning that they can proactively seek solutions to greatly reduce the likelihood of it.

As door and hardware industry experts, it is our responsibility to educate those who make decisions on access points – from school teachers to officials, and from general contractors to architects who make the design and material decisions. It’s our goal to be at the table as early as possible to educate decision makers on their options – and the impact of those options.

Lockdown with Access Control
Lockdown is the ability to prevent access to a segment or segments of a building or the entire facility for security measures. In the school environment, the lockdown can be as small as a classroom or as broad as the entire campus. In addition, the speed of the lockdown is critical and how quickly lockdown is achieved depends on the system installed.

“In the case of access control in a school environment, the first question you should ask is, ‘How do you want your lockdown to work?'” advised James Stokes, Vice-President of Access Controls for Hager Companies.

More …

RSS Feed

Lift for Life Academy

Each project we work on is unique in some fashion. Sometimes though, a project comes along that touches the heart and with it the realization there is an opportunity to assist and support beyond delivering quality products and outstanding service. Such a project and story came along in 2010 for Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT, our Senior Architectural Specifications Consultant.

In her role as Hager’s architectural specification consultant, Sheryl was approached by a local architect to generate a specification for a small school renovation. “After visiting Lift for Life Academy (LFLA), meeting the principal, the students and hearing their stories I felt compelled to reach out to help the school in any way possible,” said Simon. Describing the situation at the school to the Hager family, Sheryl said, “Without hesitation, the family offered to donate the door hardware.”

LFLA became the first independent charter middle school to open in the City of St. Louis in 2000. It was established to “provide an education to middle school students” and is sponsored by Southeast Missouri State University. The first senior class graduated in 2012 and currently, the school serves 580 students in grades 6-12.

More …

RSS Feed

A Review of DHI ConNextions 2018

Have you had a chance to catch your breath?  What an amazing few days in Baltimore at DHI ConNextions.  One of the best things about being in the Door and Hardware Industry is the fact it’s a relatively small group of people. Typically, at one point or another in our careers, we have either worked with or have known of one another for many years.  So, when we attend and exhibit at ConNextions it really is like a family reunion.

Hager had a lot of representation both from St. Louis headquarters, including the Hager Family, and our wonderful sales representatives.

Wednesday many team members attended the keynote presentation “Beyond Tragedy: Response and Recovery in a School Based Crisis”. The speaker was Michele Gay, a mother and former teacher, who helped founded Safe and Sound: A Sandy Hook Initiative.  It was a powerful presentation about her day on December 14, 2012, when her daughter was one of 26 people who was shot at Sandy Hook Elementary school.  Her strength and courage were felt throughout the room.  Her words reignited our mission to provide great products at a fair price with exceptional customer service to keep occupants of buildings safe and secure.

Michele Gay with Safe and Sound Schools

More …

RSS Feed

DHI ConNextions 2018 – Booth 319

Next week, several members of the Hager Family and team members will head to Baltimore for the annual DHI ConNextions show.

For the Hager team, this show is all about connecting with our customers.  We want to hear what’s new in their lives and businesses; collaborate our efforts in order to grow their sales; and, of course, showcase our new products. In the last year, we’ve released the following products:

We will also have demonstrations with our HS4 Electronic Access Control products including the newest communication platform BLUEnet. We are especially excited by BLUEnet’s ability to provide a real-time (within 4 seconds) lock communication, keeping people safer in an active shooter situation.

 

If you’d like to attend the show but haven’t purchased a pass yet, we have complimentary VIP Exhibit Hall Passes available. Just click on this link and in the Promo Code box type hagevip.

We look forward to seeing you!


 

 

RSS Feed

School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

More …

RSS Feed

Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

More …

RSS Feed