The Great Peshtigo Fire of 1871

A lot has been written about the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, but there was another fire that happened on the same date, in the same year, that caused greater loss of life and devastation.

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The story goes that railroad workers were clearing land for the railway and a brush fire was accidently started. Due to drought and high temperatures the flames moved rapidly and in less than an hour the town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, was in ashes.

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Keeping Patients Safe Through Life Safety Hardware by Jill Gile, CSI, CDT

Jill Gile is the newest member of Commencement Bay Architectural Group, a manufacturers’ sales agency that represent’s Hager in the Pacific Northwest. She has jumped into the hardware industry with a big splash including recently passing her CDT exam.

This is an article she wrote for the June Edition of the DHI Doors & Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with both Jill’s & DHI’s permission.

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Humans are a reactive species. We tend to carry on with a standard mode of operation until an emergency tells us that we might have to change our ways. This holds true for many aspects of our lives, personal and professional. It might be as simple as changing eating habits to as big as the Titanic creating laws about lifeboat requirements.

For the construction industry, unfortunately, we are faced with Titanic-level issues of life safety. Rules regarding fire codes and ADA accessibility issues are some of the main examples of changes the industry has had to face.

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UCLA Lockdown

Yesterday there was a lock down on the UCLA campus in the Engineering 4 building. With the use of social media word spread quickly and students definitely took the alert the school sent out seriously.

Several students posted photos on social media showing how they were barricading themselves in rooms including rooms where the doors had no locking devices.  It is difficult to determine from the photos if the rooms are specifically classrooms or not.

UCLA_June_1_2016_P3No indication if the door had locking
hardware on it and this was for reinforcement

UCLA_June_1_2016_P2@Jasonschechter states “doors open outward
and aren’t able to be locked.” Can’t tell from photo if
device is a passage function, classroom function
or if the lock wasn’t operational. If classroom function
the students were smart not to open the door to
lock from exterior side.

UCLA_June_1_2016_P1This room looks like it could be a classroom.
@whydaphnewhy is stating the “doors open outward, no locks.”

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Classroom Barricade Devices

We had another post planned but felt this was more important to share.

This video has surfaced on Facebook. It currently has 3,552,279 views, 122,560 shares, 21,189 likes and 1,153 comments.  These are the type of devices that those of us in the hardware industry are fighting against.

Facebook / Future X - via Iframely

 

From the comments it is evident that people don’t understand the dangers these devices can contribute too. If you have a moment we encourage you to comment on the Facebook post to help education the general population.

Here are links to additional information as to why barricade devices are not a good choice.

National Association of State Fire Marshals – Classroom Door Security Guidelines

Partner Alliance for Safer Schools (PASS) – White Paper on Classroom Barricade Devices

Classroom Barricade Devices and why focusing on them makes us vulnerable to threats

Expert says many of these products are not code compliant and could nullify the warrantees of locks and door hardware.

What Price Security?

Classroom Door Security

 

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Classroom Barricade Devices and why focusing on them makes us vulnerable to threats

There has been a lot of information written about classroom barricade devices. We have been watching this subject closely and are dismayed to see states overriding State, Federal and International Building Codes by allowing barricade devices. Ohio, sadly, has lead the charge. There isn’t a simple or quick solution to this issue but our goal is to remind parents, students, teachers and politicians to look at the whole picture and use their building code officials and the door and hardware industry as expert sources.

The article below was written by Lt. Joe Hendry, CLEE who is a 26 year veteran of the Kent State Police Department. He serves as an Intelligence Liaison Officer for the Ohio Department of Homeland Security and has been named a subject matter expert by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office for active threat response. Lt. Hendry holds a bachelor’s degree in telecommunications and served honorably in the United States Marine Corps. He is a trained crisis intervention team officer in mental health. He is an instructor in solo-engagement tactics, active shooter response, preventing and responding to suicide bombing incidents and tactical chemical weapons. He is a national instructor the the ALICE Training Institute and has trained staff and students, and consulted on security plans for pre-school, K-12, universities, hospitals, libraries, MRDD facilities, business and industry. In other words he is an expert.

This article appeared in the October edition of DHI Doors and Hardware Magazine. Lt. Hendry has graciously allowed us to reprint his article in order to help continue the education on this emotional subject.
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The first time I ever observed a secondary locking device, it was at the State Fire Marshal’s Academy in Ohio. I was teaching an ALICE Instructor course, and a student in the class brought a device he had made to help secure a door. During a break, he demonstrated the device, and yes, it did what he said – it secured the door using the bottom of the door and the wall.

It had a few steps to install, and at the time, with Sandy Hook only four months in the rear view mirror, looked to be an impressive device. Several educators and law enforcement officers in the class remarked that they liked the device. I was non-committal but felt it might bear looking into given the concept failure of lockdown in the building breach at Sandy Hook. Looking back, the irony of the device, the location, and my naiveté has not been lost on me.

During the past two years, I have learned more about codes, doors, locks and devices than I ever thought I would need to know as a police officer. Learning the reason behind code development, door and lock manufacturing, visual communication design, and tactical civilian and law enforcement response to threats has become a way of life. As a law enforcement expert in the field of active threat response, I’m repeatedly asked for recommendations on what secondary locking device to purchase for buildings. My original thought of, “These might be the answer to our prayers,” to, “These may be the worst idea we have ever had,” evolved as I studied and learned.

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Safe Schools Week

Last week marked the American’s Safe Schools Week sponsored by the National School Safety Center, state governors and state school superintendents.

Of course the most distressing incidents in recent years are school shootings. Everyone in the AEC (Architectural, Engineering, Construction) community are looking for solutions on how we can prevent loss of life, especially with our most vulnerable citizens; our children. There are new ideas on the market today from caring individuals, sometimes parents, who see a need and take their time, energy and money to contribute to a solution. Often times life safety and fire codes are not understood and therefore not considered, which can result in code violations or even endanger the occupants of the school. More …

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