170 Years & Six Generations

We’ve heard the story about Charles Hager leaving Germany in 1848 and settling in St. Louis working for a blacksmith. Through hard work, skill, foresight, and determination he created a company that is still in business today, 170 years later. It’s a testament to Charles and the entire Hager family that C. Hager and Sons Hinge Company has grown into Hager Companies, supplying door hardware and electronic access control products worldwide.

One only needs to know the names of our lock levers to recognize a few of the members of the Hager family that contributed to the company’s successes through wars, the industrial revolution, depressions, and now the fast-paced world of technology. From an interview with the St. Louis Business Journal, Josh Hager, company president and COO, stated “It’s been our willingness to change” that has kept the company thriving.

Currently, the 5th and 6th generations are involved in steering the business. In the photo above, from left to right are Ralph, Johnston, Arch, Josh, Rusty, August, Warren, and Sonny Hager. It’s not unusual to see the Hagers walking around the St. Louis headquarters chatting with team members. Per Josh Hager “We want employees to have the opportunity to grow and thrive here.”

The company continues to build and expand incorporating the latest technology in our manufacturing process. Last year, significant improvements were installed in the Montgomery plant including a Shearing System, a new anodizing line, a fiber laser cutter, and automated pinning and keying equipment. All will increase reliability, flexibility, and output, shortening lead times and enhancing customer service. This year, the company broke ground on a new 65,000 sq. ft. distribution center that will have a state-of-the-art inventory management system.

Bringing more value is key in supporting our customers. Being an independent company, not beholden to stockholders, allows us to make decisions with our customers’ best interests in mind. As Josh Hager stated “we’re very committed to staying close to our customers.” Hager Companies continues to stand alongside our channel partners and are dedicated to the relationships we’ve fostered.

This past week the team at the Hager headquarters in St. Louis celebrated 170 years with a luncheon. While addressing the team, Ralph Hager, Vice Chairman and CEO, noted “It’s all because of people like yourselves, that work here, which makes this company great. I can’t thank you enough and I know the Hager Family will always be thankful for everyone who has contributed to the company’s success and growth.”

As the year winds down, we join with Ralph and the Hager family in saying thank you to our customers, representatives, channel partners, suppliers, leadership, and team members in celebrating this milestone. Being stewards of this wonderful company we will continue to work hard for generations to follow.

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Fire-Rated Openings with Electronic Access Control and Low-Energy Power Operators

This article appears in this month’s issue of the DHI Door Security + Safety Magazine and was reprinted here with their permission.

Balancing the need to protect property and keep lives safe while still meeting code requirements.

The mission of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is “[being] devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards,” and NFPA does this, in part, with its 300 codes and standards.

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Midway into 2019

ICYMI – this post is a quick recap of marketing announcements released in the first half of 2019.

We also want to remind you of our great continuing education AIA/CES courses. Access Control 101 is especially relevant as more facilities are requesting electronic access control solutions. Please contact your local architectural representative or complete the contact form below to get a session on the calendar today.


January 31, 2019 – Our first announcement in 2019 was to share our new TIPIT® Ligature-Resistant Hospital Tip product. Designed with safety in mind, the combination of the TIPIT® and our Roton® Continuous Geared Hinge provides a safe environment while meeting institutional requirements for preventing objects from being hung from the top of the hinge.

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Classroom Barricade Devices

Over the past few weeks, there have been numerous news articles from across the country referencing school security initiatives and several discussed the use of classroom barricade devices. As a door hardware manufacturer, this is concerning because these types of devices often do not meet life safety or fire codes requiring free egress, fire protection, or ADA accessibility.

In March of this year, the Bremen Public School District, located in Indiana, developed a new school safety initiative plan. Several levels of security are being added, including upgrading their card access system. Unfortunately, in the article that reported these upgrades, it stated “the safety plan also includes the addition of a classroom barricade device. The devices are magnetic and slide onto the back piece of the door to barricade the door and keep intruders from entering a classroom if they break the lock. The devices are already being distributed to classrooms.”¹

In 2018, the State of Indiana released a School Safety Recommendations document which specifically included verbiage on classroom door hardware.

Under Recommendation #11
“Replace classroom door hardware to ensure fire and building code compliance. The door must lock from the inside and not restrict exiting or egress from the classroom or building. This could reduce the number of non-compliant tactics being used (such as magnets) to allow easier re-entry access by students during class time.”²

Another recent news article described how a former lecturer at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln began to discuss procedures to be followed in the event of an active shooter situation. However, before the lecturer began speaking, he noticed that the classroom doors did not have locks on the inside of the doors.

Concerned, the lecturer did reach out to the University’s Facilities Service advising them of this safety concern and suggestions on how to fix it, including the use of deadbolts. The article went on to share that the concerns were forward to the UNL’s Police Department’s Assistant Chief of Police, who in turn, did reply that deadbolts were not a viable solution as “fire code prohibits the use of deadbolts in classroom spaces.”³ Listening to officials who understand building and life safety codes is vital in having code-compliant hardware.

The 2018 edition of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) notes in Chapter 15 for Existing Education Occupancies:

15.2.2.4 Classroom Door Locking to Prevent Unwanted Entry
Classroom doors shall be permitted to be locked to prevent unwanted entry provided that the locking means is approved and all the following conditions are met:

  1. The locking means shall be capable of being engaged without opening the door.
  2. The unlocking and unlatching from the classroom side of the door can be accomplished without the use of a key, tool, or special knowledge or effort.
  3. The releasing mechanism for unlocking and unlatching shall be located at a height not less than 34 in. *865 mm) and not exceeding 48 in. (1220 mm) above the finished floor.
  4. Locks, if remotely engaged, shall be unlockable from the classroom side of the door without the use of a key, tool, or special knowledge or effort.
  5. The door shall be capable of being unlocked and opened from outside the room with the necessary key or other credentials.
  6. The locking means shall not modify the door closer, panic hardware, or fire exit hardware.
  7. Modifications to the fire door assemblies, including door hardware, shall be in accordance with NFPA 80.
  8. The emergency action plan, required by 15.7.1, shall address the use of the locking and unlocking means from within and outside the room.
  9. Staff shall be drilled in the engagement and release of the locking means, from within and outside the room, as part of the emergency egress drills required by 15.7.2.

The Bremen School District disregarded NFPA Life Safety Code and their own state’s recommendations. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s assistant police chief was correct in noting deadbolts would not meet code, however the article didn’t share any further information whether solutions were provided for locking the interior side of the classroom doors.

In Massachusetts, a lawsuit was recently filed by the Lenox Public School District (near Boston) against the town of Lenox, the Massachusetts Building Code Appeals Board, and the local building inspector for requiring the school to remove the barricades devices they purchased as they do not meet Life Safety or Fire codes.

With the advent of social media and the 24/7 news cycle, information and misinformation are difficult to categorize or research. Many educators and the public may not understand the challenges classroom barricade devices present.

Selecting proper security for emergency egress, while meeting building codes can be challenging. It is important to remember that building codes are in place for a reason. The NFPA gathered statistics on school fires with 10 or more deaths. The last major school fire happened in 1958 in Chicago, IL, where ninety students and three nuns lost their lives during a fire at the Our Lady of the Angels School. We all can agree that keeping our children safe is our number one priority.

After each major incident, we learn how to better improve buildings to keep people safer. Following the Columbine tragedy that happened 20 years ago on April 20th, a new lock function was introduced called the intruder classroom function, that allows mechanical control of the outside lever via a key from either the interior and exterior side of the door. A standard classroom function lock is controlled by a key in the outside cylinder, which locks or unlocks the outside lever. The intruder classroom function allows a person to lock the door with a key from inside the room rather than stepping out into the hallway. Today, there are many more code-compliant options available.

The Door Security + Safety Foundation has gathered many resources for how to combine safety and security on their Lock Don’t Block website. These include articles, white papers, and other documents from organizations such as Safe and Sound Schools, Pass – Partner Alliance for Safer Schools, The School Superintendent Association, and the National Association of State Fire Marshals, among others.

The advancement of technology has introduced several electronic access control solutions. Online locks no longer need to be hardwired making installation easier and less expensive. Obviously, we feel our HS4 electronic hardware solution is the best, but our hope is to educate school districts, parents, and facility maintenance personnel that there is cost-effective code-compliant hardware available. We do not feel barricade devices are an acceptable solution for school security, due to possible unintended consequences.  We can help you design a safe school security system that meets building and life safety codes.

For more information on our HS4 Hager powered by Salto Electronic Access Control Solutions please contact your local sales representative or email [email protected] .

¹ Indiana District Develops School Safety Initiative Plan 
² 2018 Indiana School Safety Recommendations
³ The Gray Area of Classroom Locks

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Understanding Today’s Access Control Solutions

This article appears in the February issue of the DHI Security + Safety Magazine and is reprinted here with their permission.

Electronic access control systems offer an effective way to control and manage access for facilities large and small. From retail and office space to education, government, healthcare, and multifamily complexes, today’s systems are versatile enough to not only meet current needs but also have the ability to expand in the future – giving you and your clients the peace of mind of knowing they are making a sound investment.

Electronic access control technology delivers value beyond security and safety by also providing valuable business intelligence – allowing you to monitor who is entering and leaving your facilities, time and duration of visits, traffic flow and more.

TYPES OF ACCESS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY
Recognizing that a one-size-fits-all answer doesn’t work with today’s designs, access control technology is a diverse solution to secure any new or existing facility. Here’s an overview of three types of electronic access control solutions.

Stand-Alone Access Control
With stand-alone access control technology, all the decisions are made at the lock, by the lock. A stand-alone lock needs to be told what access to be given, so if a company wants to add – or delete – a user, they must physically go to the lock to reprogram it using a handheld device.

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Team Member Profile – Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT – Manager, Architectural Specification Consultants

Sheryl Simon has been with Hager Companies for 13 years and was recently promoted to Manager, Architectural Specifications Consultants. We sat down with Sheryl to ask her a few questions.

Sheryl Simon at one of the many CSI STL events she volunteers for. Sheryl currently is 2nd VP for the chapter. Photo credit: George Everding

Childhood AmbitionI was always interested in design. (I’m not sure if it’s an ambition or an obsession.) Even as a young child I was always re-arranging the furniture. My parents never knew what to expect when they came home. 

First JobWorking at a very busy ice cream stand. The lines seemed to never end but it was fun interacting with all the customers. 

What led you to the hardware industry: I married into it and very quickly became a hardware geek. 

Proudest professional momentWhen I passed my CDT. It is a very difficult exam and required a lot of studying. 

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Texas Society of Architects Show – 2018

Next week several team members will be representing Hager in booth 142 at the Texas Society of Architects Design Expo Show in Fort Worth, Texas.  The attendance at the show is excellent, and we greatly appreciate all the members that make a point of stopping by to say thank you.

This year we will be highlighting our electronic access control line, HS4 – Hager powered by Salto.

The HS4 access control system is a suite of modular products that give architects the ability to provide different levels of security and safety that fit a range of budgets to meet the owner and facility’s needs. Recognizing a one-size-fits-all solution doesn’t work in today’s designs, HS4 has the ability to diversely secure an existing or new facility and expand with future growth.

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SCIP and CONSTRUCT – 2018

Next week, several members of the Hager team will be heading to Long Beach, California for the annual Specifications Consultants in Independent Practice meeting, better known as SCIP, and the CONSTRUCT Education and Exhibits show.

We always have a great time at both events and it gives us a chance to chat with specification writers to learn how we can better help their processes and solve any pain points.

CONSTRUCT 2014 – Baltimore

Our complete line of door hardware falls under one brand, the Hager brand, and we take pride in writing true non-proprietary specifications.  We focus on being correct, clear, concise and complete to make sure all parties in the channel understand how each door opening is expected to function before it’s installed.

SCIP Members Touring Hager HQ – CONSTRUCT 2015 – St. Louis

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Product Launches

There have been several exciting announcements regarding our Hager powered by Salto HS4 and Electronic Solutions product lines this week! To make sure you haven’t missed any here is a short recap:

HS4 Electronic Access Control

KS – Keys as a Service  WebpageBrochure | Press Release

An HS4 electronic access control platform for mobile and remote administrators. KS is a cloud-based access control platform that is managed from a smartphone, tablet, or PC, and accessed from a remote software engine. Always up-to-date with the latest features via instant updates and add-ons, the KS platform is easily maintained and managed. Infinite in size, it ensures real-time monitoring and immediate resolutions of any issues with a clear audit trail. These benefits and features make the KS platform perfect for retail, rental properties, and the ever more popular shared workspace markets.

 

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Friday Fun

At Hager, we are passionate about door hardware. It’s one of the reasons we added locks, exit devices, and door controls to our product line several years ago.  Last year we partnered with Salto Systems to create our Hager powered by Salto electronic access control line. Our goal is to provide our customers with the products, service, knowledge, and partnership to elevate the value they bring to the channel.

Yet, we can’t forget our history so today we are going to throw it back a few decades with a light-hearted post.

These cartoons were created from the “inspired pens of America’s most famous cartoonists” – Tom Henderson, Virgil Partch, Lichty, Irwin Caplan, and Larry Reynolds in 1952 for our “Everything Hinges on Hager” campaign.  Let us know if any resonate with you!

Monday was Labor Day which marked the official end of summer, but there is still time to get out and enjoy the sun (make sure to lather up with sunscreen!).

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