Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark

This article was published in the August edition of the DHI Door + Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with permission.

Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark, by Ginny Powell

Tucked into the “All American City” of Lakeland, Florida, is not just a community, but the realization of a dream initiated by a small group of parents nearly 20 years ago. It’s called The Village at Noah’s Landing.

Nearly two decades ago, a small group of parents of adult children with special needs met while watching their children take part in sporting activities. They began talking with each other about what would happen to their kids if they were no longer around. Who would oversee their care?

Their worries were further reinforced when they discovered that the options for care in and around Lakeland were extremely limited. But instead of becoming defeated, these five sets of parents took action. Big action. In 1997, they created Noah’s Ark of Central Florida.

The first homes were built between 2002 and 2007 and are located near downtown Lakeland. Called Noah’s Nest, this clustering of four houses is home to 17 residents living independently with the support of their fellow residents, family, and friends.

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A Dream of Building a Community
While Noah’s Nest was a great start, the dream was always to build a bigger community for adults with developmental disabilities. The Villages of Noah’s Landing, with Phase 1 scheduled to open later this summer, is precisely that.

Phase 1 can accommodate up to 132 developmentally disabled residents and only takes up a fraction of the property’s 62 acres. When all phases are complete, the community will offer a wide selection of social, recreational, educational and vocational choices, and provide for the health care needs of its residents.

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NFMT 2016 – Recap

We are back from the NFMT Show in Baltimore and as always, we had a great time. This is a terrific show to see, and listen to the people who install and maintain our hardware.

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The Hager Team arrived in Baltimore Monday to bright blue skies.  After a stop to drop off luggage at the Hilton Inner Harbor we headed to the Baltimore Convention Center to organize the product displays, giveaways and literature in our booth.

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The Hilton Inner Harbor and Baltimore Convention Center sit a block from Camden Yards. Too bad baseball season hadn’t started yet!

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Classroom Barricade Devices and why focusing on them makes us vulnerable to threats

There has been a lot of information written about classroom barricade devices. We have been watching this subject closely and are dismayed to see states overriding State, Federal and International Building Codes by allowing barricade devices. Ohio, sadly, has lead the charge. There isn’t a simple or quick solution to this issue but our goal is to remind parents, students, teachers and politicians to look at the whole picture and use their building code officials and the door and hardware industry as expert sources.

The article below was written by Lt. Joe Hendry, CLEE who is a 26 year veteran of the Kent State Police Department. He serves as an Intelligence Liaison Officer for the Ohio Department of Homeland Security and has been named a subject matter expert by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office for active threat response. Lt. Hendry holds a bachelor’s degree in telecommunications and served honorably in the United States Marine Corps. He is a trained crisis intervention team officer in mental health. He is an instructor in solo-engagement tactics, active shooter response, preventing and responding to suicide bombing incidents and tactical chemical weapons. He is a national instructor the the ALICE Training Institute and has trained staff and students, and consulted on security plans for pre-school, K-12, universities, hospitals, libraries, MRDD facilities, business and industry. In other words he is an expert.

This article appeared in the October edition of DHI Doors and Hardware Magazine. Lt. Hendry has graciously allowed us to reprint his article in order to help continue the education on this emotional subject.
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The first time I ever observed a secondary locking device, it was at the State Fire Marshal’s Academy in Ohio. I was teaching an ALICE Instructor course, and a student in the class brought a device he had made to help secure a door. During a break, he demonstrated the device, and yes, it did what he said – it secured the door using the bottom of the door and the wall.

It had a few steps to install, and at the time, with Sandy Hook only four months in the rear view mirror, looked to be an impressive device. Several educators and law enforcement officers in the class remarked that they liked the device. I was non-committal but felt it might bear looking into given the concept failure of lockdown in the building breach at Sandy Hook. Looking back, the irony of the device, the location, and my naiveté has not been lost on me.

During the past two years, I have learned more about codes, doors, locks and devices than I ever thought I would need to know as a police officer. Learning the reason behind code development, door and lock manufacturing, visual communication design, and tactical civilian and law enforcement response to threats has become a way of life. As a law enforcement expert in the field of active threat response, I’m repeatedly asked for recommendations on what secondary locking device to purchase for buildings. My original thought of, “These might be the answer to our prayers,” to, “These may be the worst idea we have ever had,” evolved as I studied and learned.

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Project Profile: International Training Center (Phase V)

Project Profile:             International Training Center (Phase V)

Client:                            United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America

Architect:                       Carlile Coatsworth Architects

General Contractor:     Penta Building Group

Distributor:                    Hallgren – Las Vegas

Installers:                       American Door Installation

Door Openings:            200

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (UBC) maintains its International Training Center (ITC) in Las Vegas, Nevada. With the completion of Phase V this campus consists of nearly a million square feet. At the core of this facility are the training areas that will keep union carpenters skills up to date with emerging technology.

Phase V comprises a 223,000 square feet building which houses 30 classrooms, a working shop, ballrooms and a museum/lobby area. There are over two dozen custom display cases dispersed throughout the lobby full of historic UBC artifacts. More …

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Project Profile: University Place at West Virginia University

Having a safe and comfortable living space is important all the time but never more so than when a person moves away from home for the first time. Often, that first time happens when kids are off to college.

Architect:                   Grimm + Parker
Developer:                 Paradigm Development Group LLC
General Contractor:   Turner Construction
Distributor:                 A. G. Mauro Company
Door Openings:         300
Project Dollar Value:  $70,000,000

photo by Grimm + Parker

The team above hit all the highlights when they designed and built University Place, a student housing community near West Virginia University.

Hager Co put together a comprehensive commercial hardware package that included standard and heavy duty products to match the door use frequency and kept within budget. More …

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CONSTRUCT Blogger’s Panel 2014

We were pleased to once again attend the CONSTRUCT’s Blogger Panel at the annual CSI Convention happening this week in Baltimore.

The moderator was Eric Lussier, who has his own blog at Eric D. Lussier.

The panel this year consisted of:

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The Door and Hardware Institute – #DHI2014

This week many in our industry will be converging in Dallas for the 2014 DHI CoNEXTions Convention. Several members of the Hager Companies team will be there. Why do we choose to take the time, energy, and dollars to exhibit at DHI CoNEXTions? Simple: because our customers will be there.

The Door and Hardware Institute’s purpose is “to advance life safety and security within a built environment.”  DHI is also an advocate for creating a favorable code environment in the life safety and security industry. They have been instrumental in supporting changes to code to save lives, like the new code for annual fire door inspections.
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