The DSSF / Hager Companies Scholarship Winner!

We have always felt educating the next generation is an important aspect of our business and industry. Offering continuing education to our team members through the Door and Hardware Institute (DHI), the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), among other organizations on key programs related to safety and security issues is another key step.

DHI’s Safety & Security Foundation (DSSF) also encourages and attracts new talent to the industry and gives them the training, tools and education to help them be successful. It was an easy decision to partner with the Foundation and establish the Hager Companies Scholarship.

This year we congratulate Alison Nugent, a senior detailer with DH Pace in Olathe, Kansas as the winner of the Hager Companies Scholarship! Alison answered a few questions DHI put forth to all the winners in November’s issue of Doors + Hardware Magazine and we wanted to share her responses here.

How did you get started in the door and hardware industry?
I returned from a summer internship in the United Kingdom and was looking for a full-time position.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
I enjoy providing a service that helps create functional buildings that meet the needs of people who use them every day. While the industry can be challenging, I enjoy being a technical resource for architects and general contractors.

How do you de-stress?
I de-stress by cleaning and organizing things. I also enjoy exercising and playing sports.

If you weren’t a door security and safety professional, what would you be?
I would work in a position in the sports industry. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I am a big sports fan.

Who is your mentor/hero?
My mentor was my late co-worker Steve Holden. Steve had over 30 years’ experience in this industry and was full of knowledge. He was an incredible resource and person and I am thankful for everything he taught me.

What is your advice to someone considering taking DHI technical education?
The DHI technical education is a big commitment, but worth the effort. While it can seem overwhelming, focus on completing one class at a time. That has helped me stay motivated to achieve my overall goal.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Something that my family, friends, teachers and co-workers have all shared: Do not be afraid to ask questions.” Asking questions demonstrates a desire to learn and grow. I have learned a lot by asking questions and will continue to do that throughout my career.

Congratulations and wishing you continued success Alison! You can read about all the winners on DSSF website here.

 

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The Great Peshtigo Fire of 1871

A lot has been written about the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, but there was another fire that happened on the same date, in the same year, that caused greater loss of life and devastation.

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The story goes that railroad workers were clearing land for the railway and a brush fire was accidently started. Due to drought and high temperatures the flames moved rapidly and in less than an hour the town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, was in ashes.

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Keeping Patients Safe Through Life Safety Hardware by Jill Gile, CSI, CDT

Jill Gile is the newest member of Commencement Bay Architectural Group, a manufacturers’ sales agency that represent’s Hager in the Pacific Northwest. She has jumped into the hardware industry with a big splash including recently passing her CDT exam.

This is an article she wrote for the June Edition of the DHI Doors & Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with both Jill’s & DHI’s permission.

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Humans are a reactive species. We tend to carry on with a standard mode of operation until an emergency tells us that we might have to change our ways. This holds true for many aspects of our lives, personal and professional. It might be as simple as changing eating habits to as big as the Titanic creating laws about lifeboat requirements.

For the construction industry, unfortunately, we are faced with Titanic-level issues of life safety. Rules regarding fire codes and ADA accessibility issues are some of the main examples of changes the industry has had to face.

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UCLA Lockdown

Yesterday there was a lock down on the UCLA campus in the Engineering 4 building. With the use of social media word spread quickly and students definitely took the alert the school sent out seriously.

Several students posted photos on social media showing how they were barricading themselves in rooms including rooms where the doors had no locking devices.  It is difficult to determine from the photos if the rooms are specifically classrooms or not.

UCLA_June_1_2016_P3No indication if the door had locking
hardware on it and this was for reinforcement

UCLA_June_1_2016_P2@Jasonschechter states “doors open outward
and aren’t able to be locked.” Can’t tell from photo if
device is a passage function, classroom function
or if the lock wasn’t operational. If classroom function
the students were smart not to open the door to
lock from exterior side.

UCLA_June_1_2016_P1This room looks like it could be a classroom.
@whydaphnewhy is stating the “doors open outward, no locks.”

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2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

We have received numerous requests for clarification due to an editorial change concerning the maximum allowable force to operate door hardware when the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design became effective in March of 2012.

Prior to the 2010 edition the ADA standards required door hardware to have “a shape that is easy to grasp, and does not require tight grasping, tight pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate.” The wording does not reference any other section nor does it mention a force limitation. A paragraph relative to door opening force, which is different than operational force, stated that interior, non-fire-rated doors must have a maximum opening force of 5 pounds, but clarified the statement by stating, “These forces do not apply to the force required to retract latch bolts or disengage other devices that may hold the door in a closed position.”

Section 404.2.7 on door hardware reads: “Door and Gate Hardware. Handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operable parts on doors and gates shall comply with 309.4. Operable parts of such hardware shall be 34 inches (865 mm) minimum and 48 inches (120 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground. Where sliding doors are in the fully open position, operating hardware shall be exposed and usable from both sides.”

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New Products Announcement

4500 Series Exit Device Decorative Lever Options

The decorative lever options on our 2300 Series Tubular and 3800 Series Mortise Locks are now available with our 4500 Series Exit Device. Now you can complete the elegant look on door openings requiring exit devices.  Available in US3, US4, US10, US10B, US26 & US26D. Additional information is available here.

4500_Exit_Trim Charles_LeverJohnston_Lever

Joshua_LeverLouis_LeverWarren_Lever

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Don’t get locked out!

Understanding which lock function a customer needs can mean the difference between a happy customer or an unhappy one, if the lock doesn’t function how they expected.

The function is the mechanical behavior of the lock. The need (or not) for security on the door opening dictates what type of function is required. A door to a coat closet typically requires less security than a door to a mechanical room. As buildings become more complex, door openings and therefore door hardware also does. We offer over 35 ANSI functions that we discussed in a previous blog post here.

The use of the cylindrical mechanical lock entry function ANSI F109/Hager 53 and the office function ANSI F82/Hager 50 are sometimes misunderstood. More …

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Lockset Grades

Founded in 1925 as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, now the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association, BHMA took a leadership role in developing standards for builder’s hardware to ensure quality and performance. Hager Companies has been a member for many years.

Hardware is a key element in buildings as door openings provide means of egress, security and building accessibility for people with physical disabilities. BHMA developed a minimum performance grading system for all hardware including lockets. This grading system is also accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), a private, non-profit organization that coordinates the voluntary standardization in developing and maintaining performance standards for builder’s hardware. More …

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Euroline Hardware

There were many exhaustive deliberations before the Hager team decided to embark on the “Euroline” quest.

Most of us in the door hardware industry are familiar with ANSI – American National Standards Institute, BHMA – Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association, along with UL – Underwriters Laboratories and Intertek. However these standards and fire codes, which are strictly enforced in the United States and Canada, are not customary in approximately 90% of the rest of the world.

European standards – EN and CE – are dominant in Europe, the Middle East and most of Asia. Any hardware products sold into areas that embrace these standards must meet their cycle and fire tests, which are completely different than those of ANSI and UL.

Here in the States commercial locks are sold as a complete unit. European locksets are sold in component form: lock body, lever set and cylinder. This allows end users to mix and match cylinders, levers and lock bodies from a vast array of different manufacturers. It also allows multiple mechanical and electronic keyways to be used interchangeably. This modular approach allows for greater flexibility on the jobsite.

                                                       

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Lock Function Chart

We are in the process of uploading a BHMA lock function chart to our website to make it easy to quickly match what lock function is being specified to our Grade 1, Grade 2 & Grade 3 locksets. This chart will be able to be found under Resources / Product Information / Locks.

Founded in 1925, as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (BHMA) role has been developing standards for the wide range (and getting wider) of builders hardware. There are three levels of grades for locksets based on the number of cycles an owner can expect the product to withstand. Grade 1 is the heaviest duty, passing 2,500,000 cycles while Grade 3 passes just 350,000 cycles. The price difference between Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 varies and may present an occasion to save the owner money on a project. Specifying a Grade 1 lock on a main entry office door is highly recommended but there is opportunity to save dollars by utilizing a Grade 2 lock on a door opening used less frequently, like a closet door. That said it is important not to undersize the lock grade on a door opening in order to save money as it could cost more in repairs in the future. More …

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