Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

More …

RSS Feed

Don’t get locked out!

Understanding which lock function a customer needs can mean the difference between a happy customer or an unhappy one, if the lock doesn’t function how they expected.

The function is the mechanical behavior of the lock. The need (or not) for security on the door opening dictates what type of function is required. A door to a coat closet typically requires less security than a door to a mechanical room. As buildings become more complex, door openings and therefore door hardware also does. We offer over 35 ANSI functions that we discussed in a previous blog post here.

The use of the cylindrical mechanical lock entry function ANSI F109/Hager 53 and the office function ANSI F82/Hager 50 are sometimes misunderstood. More …

RSS Feed

Lockset Grades

Founded in 1925 as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, now the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association, BHMA took a leadership role in developing standards for builder’s hardware to ensure quality and performance. Hager Companies has been a member for many years.

Hardware is a key element in buildings as door openings provide means of egress, security and building accessibility for people with physical disabilities. BHMA developed a minimum performance grading system for all hardware including lockets. This grading system is also accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), a private, non-profit organization that coordinates the voluntary standardization in developing and maintaining performance standards for builder’s hardware. More …

RSS Feed

Education and Training

Is one of your New Year’s Resolutions pursuing additional continuing education?

We can make it easy for you to check that off your list! Here at Hager Companies we believe the more informed our customers are about door openings, codes and our products the more successful a project will be.

That is why we offer training for pretty much everyone in the building industry. From architects, specifiers, distributors, physical plant maintenance personnel to end users or we can create a training session specifically for your team.

These education sessions can be held at your office so you don’t have to worry about completing those pesky travel reports.


Or, if you would like to set up training at a central location in order that several of your personnel from different branches can attend we can do that too.



We also have a National Sales & Product Training Manager who travels the United States sharing her 20 year knowledge about the industry.



Several of our educational sessions are AIA accredited. Below is just a small sample of the sessions we offer. For a complete list click here.



Give your local sales representative a call to learn more.

RSS Feed

Euroline Hardware

There were many exhaustive deliberations before the Hager team decided to embark on the “Euroline” quest.

Most of us in the door hardware industry are familiar with ANSI – American National Standards Institute, BHMA – Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association, along with UL – Underwriters Laboratories and Intertek. However these standards and fire codes, which are strictly enforced in the United States and Canada, are not customary in approximately 90% of the rest of the world.

European standards – EN and CE – are dominant in Europe, the Middle East and most of Asia. Any hardware products sold into areas that embrace these standards must meet their cycle and fire tests, which are completely different than those of ANSI and UL.

Here in the States commercial locks are sold as a complete unit. European locksets are sold in component form: lock body, lever set and cylinder. This allows end users to mix and match cylinders, levers and lock bodies from a vast array of different manufacturers. It also allows multiple mechanical and electronic keyways to be used interchangeably. This modular approach allows for greater flexibility on the jobsite.


More …

RSS Feed

Lock Function Chart

We are in the process of uploading a BHMA lock function chart to our website to make it easy to quickly match what lock function is being specified to our Grade 1, Grade 2 & Grade 3 locksets. This chart will be able to be found under Resources / Product Information / Locks.

Founded in 1925, as the Hardware Manufacturers’ Statistical Association, the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (BHMA) role has been developing standards for the wide range (and getting wider) of builders hardware. There are three levels of grades for locksets based on the number of cycles an owner can expect the product to withstand. Grade 1 is the heaviest duty, passing 2,500,000 cycles while Grade 3 passes just 350,000 cycles. The price difference between Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 varies and may present an occasion to save the owner money on a project. Specifying a Grade 1 lock on a main entry office door is highly recommended but there is opportunity to save dollars by utilizing a Grade 2 lock on a door opening used less frequently, like a closet door. That said it is important not to undersize the lock grade on a door opening in order to save money as it could cost more in repairs in the future. More …

RSS Feed