Latch Protectors

Being a door hardware manufacturer we are passionate about security. Keeping a door shut and locked plays an important role in keeping people safe. When you hear “security” you may be envisioning a lot of different equipment like cameras, card readers, and maybe even grilles over doors and windows. Hager offers several levels of door hardware security options, but depending on your facility some simple, first steps, may be a better choice.

In the photos below you’ll notice a metal plate that runs vertically along the seam of the pair of doors, by the lockset. This metal plate is called a latch protector and they are available in a wide range of sizes, finishes, and shapes so they can be installed or retrofitted to most locks on both single and pairs of doors.

While we don’t recommend this application, we appreciate the effort of the building owner to resolve a security issue on an existing pair of doors.

This piece of hardware is designed to deter forced entry through door prying, kick-ins, and other actions to gain unauthorized access. Latch protectors provide simple protection from break-ins that is easy to install and is a low-cost first step in a line of defense.  Door openings where latch protectors may be useful include exterior entry, storage, equipment, or any opening where you need a little extra bit of security.

For more information about our latch protection products or any of our many other security products please contact your local sales representative or our customer service department at 800-255-3590.

 

RSS Feed

How to Size a Push Bar

We’ve all heard the adage “measure twice, cut once”. This definitely applies when prepping doors for hardware. And, how to order certain door hardware for doors, like push bars.

We have several helpful documents on our website and How to Size a Push Bar is one of them. This document can be found under the Related Files tab on all our push bar product web pages.

Here are a few tips –

For a Flush Door

To determine the size of a bent end bar with bracket take the door width minus 5″ and that will equal the correct push bar length.

More …

RSS Feed

Concave vs. Convex Wall Stops

Wall and floor stops are inexpensive products that, when installed correctly, can help prevent damage to a wall, lockset or door. If a door is forcefully pushed open, a stop is meant to protect the wall from being gouged by the door or lockset, and it will also protect the door hardware from being damaged by a quick meeting with the wall.

 

Wall and floor stops come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes and can be mounted on the wall or on the floor behind the door.  For this post, we are going to focus on concave and convex wall stops.

More …

RSS Feed

Team Member Profile – Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT – Manager, Architectural Specification Consultants

Sheryl Simon has been with Hager Companies for 13 years and was recently promoted to Manager, Architectural Specifications Consultants. We sat down with Sheryl to ask her a few questions.

Sheryl Simon at one of the many CSI STL events she volunteers for. Sheryl currently is 2nd VP for the chapter. Photo credit: George Everding

Childhood AmbitionI was always interested in design. (I’m not sure if it’s an ambition or an obsession.) Even as a young child I was always re-arranging the furniture. My parents never knew what to expect when they came home. 

First JobWorking at a very busy ice cream stand. The lines seemed to never end but it was fun interacting with all the customers. 

What led you to the hardware industry: I married into it and very quickly became a hardware geek. 

Proudest professional momentWhen I passed my CDT. It is a very difficult exam and required a lot of studying. 

More …

RSS Feed

Why is the Bottom Rod Missing?

Have you ever come across a pair of doors that have just a top vertical rod exit device and not top and bottom, and wondered why? Often an architect or specification writer will specify “less bottom rod (LBR)” on pairs of doors, especially in healthcare facilities.

This photo was taken in an assisted living facility here in St. Louis. This opening is a pair of fire rated corridor doors which means they must positively latch in case of a fire to control flames and smoke from traveling through the facility. Without latching hardware on the exit device itself, positive latching is accomplished with the surface mounted top vertical rod. As you can see from the picture, the door is being held open with a magnetic hold open tied into the fire alarm. If the fire alarm is activated the hold open will release the door. The door closer will swing the door shut and the top vertical rod will latch the door.

This leads us to the question of why the architect or specification writer specified LBR. While the top and bottom vertical rods help secure the door, the bottom vertical rod is secured to a floor strike mounted in the floor. That floor strike can become a tripping hazard to people that use mobility devices, such as canes, walkers, crutches, and wheelchairs. ADA regulation 404.2.10, Door and Gate Surfaces, states: “Swing door and gate surfaces within 10 inches (255mm) of the finish floor or ground measured vertically shall have a smooth surface on the push side extending the full width of the door or gate.” The regulation goes on to specify how thick protection plates and installation screws can be.

This installation is a textbook example of the intersection of fire code and ADA regulations. The goal is to keep people safe both from fire and tripping. When architects and door hardware professionals work together, the result can be a safe, attractive and code compliant facility.

For assistance in writing door hardware specifications please contact Brian Clarke at [email protected]. For information regarding our products please contact our customer service team at 800-255-3590 or your local sales representative.

RSS Feed

SCIP and CONSTRUCT – 2018

Next week, several members of the Hager team will be heading to Long Beach, California for the annual Specifications Consultants in Independent Practice meeting, better known as SCIP, and the CONSTRUCT Education and Exhibits show.

We always have a great time at both events and it gives us a chance to chat with specification writers to learn how we can better help their processes and solve any pain points.

CONSTRUCT 2014 – Baltimore

Our complete line of door hardware falls under one brand, the Hager brand, and we take pride in writing true non-proprietary specifications.  We focus on being correct, clear, concise and complete to make sure all parties in the channel understand how each door opening is expected to function before it’s installed.

SCIP Members Touring Hager HQ – CONSTRUCT 2015 – St. Louis

More …

RSS Feed

ICYMI – Product Launches 2018 to date

How did it get to be the middle of July already? Summer is half over and the next school year is just around the corner.

On today’s blog we are highlighting several of our 2018 product launches, just in case you missed the original release.

January 2018 – 3300 Series Grade 3 Tubular Leverset
A great addition for the multi-family and assisted living markets. The 3300 Series is field reversible (exception of 3317 Johnston), has a thru-bolt design for easy installation, and comes standard with a 4-way latch – perfect for most retrofit applications. It meets BHMA ANSI 156.2, Grade 3 test standards and is ADA compliant ANSI A117.1 Accessibility Code. Available functions include passage, privacy, entry and single dummy. Lever options are Archer, August, Johnston, and Withnell.

More …

RSS Feed

2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

We have received numerous requests for clarification due to an editorial change concerning the maximum allowable force to operate door hardware when the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design became effective in March of 2012.

Prior to the 2010 edition the ADA standards required door hardware to have “a shape that is easy to grasp, and does not require tight grasping, tight pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate.” The wording does not reference any other section nor does it mention a force limitation. A paragraph relative to door opening force, which is different than operational force, stated that interior, non-fire-rated doors must have a maximum opening force of 5 pounds, but clarified the statement by stating, “These forces do not apply to the force required to retract latch bolts or disengage other devices that may hold the door in a closed position.”

Section 404.2.7 on door hardware reads: “Door and Gate Hardware. Handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operable parts on doors and gates shall comply with 309.4. Operable parts of such hardware shall be 34 inches (865 mm) minimum and 48 inches (120 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground. Where sliding doors are in the fully open position, operating hardware shall be exposed and usable from both sides.”

More …

RSS Feed

International Sales Meeting

With 167 years of history in St. Louis sometimes it’s easy to forget that Hager is a international company.  We have projects going on all over the world, from the Grand Egyptian Museum currently being built in Cairo to the completed Sheraton Zhanjiang Minda Hotel in Zhanjiang City, Guangdong Province in China.

Our Vice President of International Sales, James Stokes, has a great team of international sales representatives that travels the globe. Two weeks ago they gathered in St. Louis for their sales meeting.

A lot was discussed in the two day meeting.  From a business brief to detailed product line and technical training from our engineering team, tech support crew and product managers and, of course, taking time to catch up with the Hagers.

IMG_3983Sitting with technical & engineering

More …

RSS Feed

Lubricants

During a cold snap, when temperatures dropped below freezing, the deadbolt to my garage froze and the key wouldn’t turn. I was renting at the time so I called the property maintenance company who told me to use a hair dryer to unfreeze the lock, so I could get to work. Then the person added “I’ll send someone out to spray it with WD-40.”

Being in the hardware business we hear and learn new things every day. One of the things I learn early on is while WD-40 is good for a lot of uses, it isn’t good to spray in locks.

Our Director of Engineering, Mark McRae, wrote a White Paper on the subject, which we have shared below. There is a lot of good technical information but basically our Director of Engineering recommends using White Lithium Grease for hinges, locks, and other door hardware.

**********

The WD-40 vs White Lithium Grease vs Silicon Spray by Mark McRae
________________________________________
From getting loose a stuck bolt to lubricating metal to metal and metal to non-metal friction areas.

There are a lot of oils/lubricants/greases available for specific purposes and some that will work for a wide range of applications.

Below is information on WD-40, Silicon Spray and White Lithium Grease as they are by far the most popular “multipurpose” lubricant/greases.

WD-40

WD-40 (Water Displacement, 40th attempt) is a product that everyone uses indiscriminately on a wide range of materials.

More …

RSS Feed