Locking Down School Safety and Access Control by Gordon Holmes

This article appears in the July issue of the DHI Security + Safety Magazine and is reprinted here with their permission.

Locking Down School Safety and Access Control

According to a recent CNN article, In the first 20 weeks of 2018 there have been 22 school shootings where someone was hurt or killed.  This averages out to more than one shooting a week, so it’s no surprise that school security is a growing focus of today’s world.

Since 1999 when the Columbine shooting happened, towns such as Sandy Hook, Connecticut, Blacksburg, Virginia, and more recently Parkland, Florida -are forever etched in our minds because of the senseless violence that occurred there. While we recognize we cannot entirely prevent violence, campuses across America are learning that they can proactively seek solutions to greatly reduce the likelihood of it.

As door and hardware industry experts, it is our responsibility to educate those who make decisions on access points – from school teachers to officials, and from general contractors to architects who make the design and material decisions. It’s our goal to be at the table as early as possible to educate decision makers on their options – and the impact of those options.

Lockdown with Access Control
Lockdown is the ability to prevent access to a segment or segments of a building or the entire facility for security measures. In the school environment, the lockdown can be as small as a classroom or as broad as the entire campus. In addition, the speed of the lockdown is critical and how quickly lockdown is achieved depends on the system installed.

“In the case of access control in a school environment, the first question you should ask is, ‘How do you want your lockdown to work?'” advised James Stokes, Vice-President of Access Controls for Hager Companies.

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Lift for Life Academy

Each project we work on is unique in some fashion. Sometimes though, a project comes along that touches the heart and with it the realization there is an opportunity to assist and support beyond delivering quality products and outstanding service. Such a project and story came along in 2010 for Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT, our Senior Architectural Specifications Consultant.

In her role as Hager’s architectural specification consultant, Sheryl was approached by a local architect to generate a specification for a small school renovation. “After visiting Lift for Life Academy (LFLA), meeting the principal, the students and hearing their stories I felt compelled to reach out to help the school in any way possible,” said Simon. Describing the situation at the school to the Hager family, Sheryl said, “Without hesitation, the family offered to donate the door hardware.”

LFLA became the first independent charter middle school to open in the City of St. Louis in 2000. It was established to “provide an education to middle school students” and is sponsored by Southeast Missouri State University. The first senior class graduated in 2012 and currently, the school serves 580 students in grades 6-12.

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Fun and Finance

Our CFO, Brian Josephson, was interviewed by George Bailey for the podcast Choose the Nickel recently.  Brian shares how his parents and childhood instilled in him, and his siblings, the understanding, and importance of taking responsibility for your actions including financially.  There are a few funny stories along with some important lessons. Click on the image below to listen.

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The Next Generation

The gifted class from the Central Christian School visited Hager headquarters a few weeks ago. They were learning about the engineering profession and the different types of engineer specialties. A daughter of our COO, Josh Hager, is in the class and he offered to have the students visit Hager and hear from our engineers what they do.

Mark McRae, our Director of Engineering, and Daniel Sprehe, a Product Engineer, spoke with the students about the engineering process a product takes, from conception to manufacturing.  They spoke about how once a design has been approved a prototype is created along with the amount of testing it takes before a product is ready to be sold. They also shared the difference between a mechanical and electronic engineer and how they work together.

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A Review of DHI ConNextions 2018

Have you had a chance to catch your breath?  What an amazing few days in Baltimore at DHI ConNextions.  One of the best things about being in the Door and Hardware Industry is the fact it’s a relatively small group of people. Typically, at one point or another in our careers, we have either worked with or have known of one another for many years.  So, when we attend and exhibit at ConNextions it really is like a family reunion.

Hager had a lot of representation both from St. Louis headquarters, including the Hager Family, and our wonderful sales representatives.

Wednesday many team members attended the keynote presentation “Beyond Tragedy: Response and Recovery in a School Based Crisis”. The speaker was Michele Gay, a mother and former teacher, who helped founded Safe and Sound: A Sandy Hook Initiative.  It was a powerful presentation about her day on December 14, 2012, when her daughter was one of 26 people who was shot at Sandy Hook Elementary school.  Her strength and courage were felt throughout the room.  Her words reignited our mission to provide great products at a fair price with exceptional customer service to keep occupants of buildings safe and secure.

Michele Gay with Safe and Sound Schools

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School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

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The Geared Continuous Hinge: Solutions and Applications by Ginny Powell

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue.

While you may not give hinges much thought, they actually hold up as one of the greatest inventions of mankind back so far that archeologists aren’t sure of its exact origin. In fact, bronze hinges date back to ancient times, found in societies in Africa and Asia, as well as Europe.

In the United States, as Easterners began pouring into St. Louis in the late 1840s and early 1850s to make their westward journey, Charles Hager was building his business by providing wagon wheels and hardware for Conestoga wagons. This made Hager an active part of the new frontier in the development of hinges as we know them today.

In commercial, educational and institutional facilities, doors are hung using one of three hinge types: standard (conventional) hinges, continuous hinges or pivots – and it is the continuous hinge, with its intermeshing gears and thrust bearings, that is the far superior choice in many high use applications.

The Continuous Hinge

There are two types of continuous hinges—the pin-and-barrel and the geared. The pin-and-barrel continuous hinge (sometimes known as the piano hinge) has two leaves joined together by a pin. The geared continuous hinge features gear teeth that mesh together under a cap that runs the length of the door.

The geared continuous hinge was patented in 1963 by Austin Baer, and in 1968 he earned a second patent for adding thrust bearing to his original design, known as the Roton® Continuous Geared Hinge. The patent expired in 1985, and Hager Companies purchased Baer’s company in 1989.

“There were situations in facilities with high-abuse door openings where we knew a standard butt hinge wasn’t the best choice. We were intrigued by the Roton® continuous hinge and how it distributed the weight over the length of the door,” explains Warren Hager Executive Vice President & Assistant Secretary for Hager Companies. “We purchased The Baer Company because we felt the product was a perfect fit with the quality Hager was known for and it allowed us to bring additional value and solutions to our customers.”

Today every major U.S. commercial hardware manufacturer offers a line of continuous hinges.

Benefits of a Continuous Hinge

While continuous hinges are not as commonly used as standard hinges, there are several solid reasons for choosing a continuous hinge over another hanging device:

• Continuous hinges extend the full length of the door, which means they distribute the door’s weight evenly to the frame. This reduces the amount of stress to the doorframe when compared to using a standard or pivot hinge.
• Because a continuous hinge is secured to the full height of the opening, a continuous hinge keeps the door in constant alignment, eliminating the chance of a sagging door.
• Additionally, continuous hinges also help reduce the chance of wood doors from warping, which is especially helpful when the door opening is three-and-a-half or four-feet wide.
• Continuous hinges also remove the gap between the door and the frame, and this absence of the gap helps prevent fingers from being pinched, which means a safer door. This safety makes a continuous hinge a natural choice for doors where children are present.

Those are the exact reasons Jeff Chan, locksmith with Mercy Hospital, changed the specifications for the hospital and now requires continuous geared hinges on all doors over three-feet wide. “Installing continuous geared hinges on door openings over three feet in width decreases future issues, saving us time and money,” he says.

Smart Applications for a Continuous Hinge

These characteristics mean that continuous hinges are often installed for openings that are subject to high traffic and abuse, such as gymnasiums, health care facilities and sports complexes. “As the population continues to grow, the demand on door openings increases with security and safety at the forefront,” explains Dan White, Manager of Product Development for Hager Companies. “For these high-demand openings, the continuous geared hinge remains the smartest choice for the life of an opening.”

Here are a few examples of where you can install a continuous hinge:

HOSPITALS, STADIUMS ARENAS, AND SCHOOL GYMNASIUMS
Over time, the doors that get a lot of use also tend to “come off their hinges” and sag or warp. Because a continuous hinge runs the length of the door, it keeps the door in constant alignment and eliminates this issue.

PRISONS AND BACK DOOR TO CONVENIENCE STORES AND STRIP MALLS
A geared continuous hinge can keep a building even more secure than a standard hinge because there isn’t a pin that can be removed. In fact, prying off a continuous hinge would be time-consuming – which acts as a deterrent.

STOREFRONTS
Doors allow air to escape, which can be a great source of energy loss when trying to warm or cool the air (depending on the time of year). A continuous hinge helps close the gap between the door and the frame – creating a tighter seal.

One example where a continuous hinge solved a recurring door problem was at a St. Louis university hospital radiology treatment room. The doors were four by seven feet (lined in ¼” lead) and hung on heavy duty pivot hinges with an intermediate pivot. The bottom pin on the floor pivot broke twice, and as a result, the room was rendered unusable. This cost the hospital about $24,000 a day in lost revenue, not to mention the delay in treatment for patients.

“The late Richard Mehaffy, CAHC, a distributor, reached out to me to discuss the issue. After conferring with the technical department at Hager, we recommended installing a Roton® continuous lead lined aluminum hinge designed specifically for doors up to 1,200 pounds. This solved the problem immediately and we never got a call back again,” explained Bud Wilson, President of Horizon Marketing Group.

Continuous hinges are generally available in five standard lengths: 79, 83, 85, 95, and 119 inches, and can be cut to the exact length needed during the installation process (varies by manufacturer). With the frequent use of electronic locks today, continuous hinges can also be modified for concealed electric through-wires, exposed electric switches, and electric power transfers.

Though continuous hinges are not as commonly used as their standard counterpart, they are a financially smart solution. They are durable, long-lasting and solid, which allows for an extended life for the total door opening.

 

Ginny Powell, is a Product Marketing Specialist. She can be reached at [email protected]

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Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

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The DSSF / Hager Companies Scholarship Winner!

We have always felt educating the next generation is an important aspect of our business and industry. Offering continuing education to our team members through the Door and Hardware Institute (DHI), the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), among other organizations on key programs related to safety and security issues is another key step.

DHI’s Safety & Security Foundation (DSSF) also encourages and attracts new talent to the industry and gives them the training, tools and education to help them be successful. It was an easy decision to partner with the Foundation and establish the Hager Companies Scholarship.

This year we congratulate Alison Nugent, a senior detailer with DH Pace in Olathe, Kansas as the winner of the Hager Companies Scholarship! Alison answered a few questions DHI put forth to all the winners in November’s issue of Doors + Hardware Magazine and we wanted to share her responses here.

How did you get started in the door and hardware industry?
I returned from a summer internship in the United Kingdom and was looking for a full-time position.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
I enjoy providing a service that helps create functional buildings that meet the needs of people who use them every day. While the industry can be challenging, I enjoy being a technical resource for architects and general contractors.

How do you de-stress?
I de-stress by cleaning and organizing things. I also enjoy exercising and playing sports.

If you weren’t a door security and safety professional, what would you be?
I would work in a position in the sports industry. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I am a big sports fan.

Who is your mentor/hero?
My mentor was my late co-worker Steve Holden. Steve had over 30 years’ experience in this industry and was full of knowledge. He was an incredible resource and person and I am thankful for everything he taught me.

What is your advice to someone considering taking DHI technical education?
The DHI technical education is a big commitment, but worth the effort. While it can seem overwhelming, focus on completing one class at a time. That has helped me stay motivated to achieve my overall goal.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Something that my family, friends, teachers and co-workers have all shared: Do not be afraid to ask questions.” Asking questions demonstrates a desire to learn and grow. I have learned a lot by asking questions and will continue to do that throughout my career.

Congratulations and wishing you continued success Alison! You can read about all the winners on DSSF website here.

 

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Touchless Actuators

It is a fact of life that we can’t get away from germs, but there are ways to control the spread of them.

That’s why we’re excited to announce our new line of touchless actuators. For use with our 8400 & 8200 Series low energy power operators, the touchless actuators employ capacitance technology similar to smart devices. They have an adjustable sensing range from 0″-4″ and a LED illumination which increases plate visibility.

2-659-0303                                                                                   2-659-0303

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