School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

In the last 18 years, there have been, unfortunately, many more school shootings.  Mechanical and electronic access control continues to develop to provide safer buildings. Other security measures that have been implemented in many school districts include metal detectors, security cameras, ID badges, visitor management software, limiting entry/exit points, security guards, and much more.  There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution.

We also must not forget that life and fire safety are equally as important as security. Balancing both can be challenging for facilities. Many of the recently introduced classroom barricade devices don’t provide the ability to allow for free egress.  You just have to Google The Iroquois Fire, The Cocoanut Grove Nightclub, The Beverly Hills Supper Club and the Station Nightclub fires to understand why having a clear means of egress is vital to saving lives in case of fire.

Ultimately we wish every school could be equipped with an electronic access control solution that could lock down classrooms and perimeter doors with the touch of a button, but that isn’t financially feasible for many school districts. When we introduced our new electronic access control line, HS4, last year, one of our goals was to provide different levels of security and safety that would fit a range of budgets. To learn more about our HS4 electronic access solutions please contact [email protected].

For more information on the efforts from the security and safety community please click on the links below.

 

 

 

 

RSS Feed

The Geared Continuous Hinge: Solutions and Applications by Ginny Powell

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue.

While you may not give hinges much thought, they actually hold up as one of the greatest inventions of mankind back so far that archeologists aren’t sure of its exact origin. In fact, bronze hinges date back to ancient times, found in societies in Africa and Asia, as well as Europe.

In the United States, as Easterners began pouring into St. Louis in the late 1840s and early 1850s to make their westward journey, Charles Hager was building his business by providing wagon wheels and hardware for Conestoga wagons. This made Hager an active part of the new frontier in the development of hinges as we know them today.

In commercial, educational and institutional facilities, doors are hung using one of three hinge types: standard (conventional) hinges, continuous hinges or pivots – and it is the continuous hinge, with its intermeshing gears and thrust bearings, that is the far superior choice in many high use applications.

The Continuous Hinge

There are two types of continuous hinges—the pin-and-barrel and the geared. The pin-and-barrel continuous hinge (sometimes known as the piano hinge) has two leaves joined together by a pin. The geared continuous hinge features gear teeth that mesh together under a cap that runs the length of the door.

The geared continuous hinge was patented in 1963 by Austin Baer, and in 1968 he earned a second patent for adding thrust bearing to his original design, known as the Roton® Continuous Geared Hinge. The patent expired in 1985, and Hager Companies purchased Baer’s company in 1989.

“There were situations in facilities with high-abuse door openings where we knew a standard butt hinge wasn’t the best choice. We were intrigued by the Roton® continuous hinge and how it distributed the weight over the length of the door,” explains Warren Hager Executive Vice President & Assistant Secretary for Hager Companies. “We purchased The Baer Company because we felt the product was a perfect fit with the quality Hager was known for and it allowed us to bring additional value and solutions to our customers.”

Today every major U.S. commercial hardware manufacturer offers a line of continuous hinges.

Benefits of a Continuous Hinge

While continuous hinges are not as commonly used as standard hinges, there are several solid reasons for choosing a continuous hinge over another hanging device:

• Continuous hinges extend the full length of the door, which means they distribute the door’s weight evenly to the frame. This reduces the amount of stress to the doorframe when compared to using a standard or pivot hinge.
• Because a continuous hinge is secured to the full height of the opening, a continuous hinge keeps the door in constant alignment, eliminating the chance of a sagging door.
• Additionally, continuous hinges also help reduce the chance of wood doors from warping, which is especially helpful when the door opening is three-and-a-half or four-feet wide.
• Continuous hinges also remove the gap between the door and the frame, and this absence of the gap helps prevent fingers from being pinched, which means a safer door. This safety makes a continuous hinge a natural choice for doors where children are present.

Those are the exact reasons Jeff Chan, locksmith with Mercy Hospital, changed the specifications for the hospital and now requires continuous geared hinges on all doors over three-feet wide. “Installing continuous geared hinges on door openings over three feet in width decreases future issues, saving us time and money,” he says.

Smart Applications for a Continuous Hinge

These characteristics mean that continuous hinges are often installed for openings that are subject to high traffic and abuse, such as gymnasiums, health care facilities and sports complexes. “As the population continues to grow, the demand on door openings increases with security and safety at the forefront,” explains Dan White, Manager of Product Development for Hager Companies. “For these high-demand openings, the continuous geared hinge remains the smartest choice for the life of an opening.”

Here are a few examples of where you can install a continuous hinge:

HOSPITALS, STADIUMS ARENAS, AND SCHOOL GYMNASIUMS
Over time, the doors that get a lot of use also tend to “come off their hinges” and sag or warp. Because a continuous hinge runs the length of the door, it keeps the door in constant alignment and eliminates this issue.

PRISONS AND BACK DOOR TO CONVENIENCE STORES AND STRIP MALLS
A geared continuous hinge can keep a building even more secure than a standard hinge because there isn’t a pin that can be removed. In fact, prying off a continuous hinge would be time-consuming – which acts as a deterrent.

STOREFRONTS
Doors allow air to escape, which can be a great source of energy loss when trying to warm or cool the air (depending on the time of year). A continuous hinge helps close the gap between the door and the frame – creating a tighter seal.

One example where a continuous hinge solved a recurring door problem was at a St. Louis university hospital radiology treatment room. The doors were four by seven feet (lined in ¼” lead) and hung on heavy duty pivot hinges with an intermediate pivot. The bottom pin on the floor pivot broke twice, and as a result, the room was rendered unusable. This cost the hospital about $24,000 a day in lost revenue, not to mention the delay in treatment for patients.

“The late Richard Mehaffy, CAHC, a distributor, reached out to me to discuss the issue. After conferring with the technical department at Hager, we recommended installing a Roton® continuous lead lined aluminum hinge designed specifically for doors up to 1,200 pounds. This solved the problem immediately and we never got a call back again,” explained Bud Wilson, President of Horizon Marketing Group.

Continuous hinges are generally available in five standard lengths: 79, 83, 85, 95, and 119 inches, and can be cut to the exact length needed during the installation process (varies by manufacturer). With the frequent use of electronic locks today, continuous hinges can also be modified for concealed electric through-wires, exposed electric switches, and electric power transfers.

Though continuous hinges are not as commonly used as their standard counterpart, they are a financially smart solution. They are durable, long-lasting and solid, which allows for an extended life for the total door opening.

 

Ginny Powell, is a Product Marketing Specialist. She can be reached at [email protected]

RSS Feed

Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

More …

RSS Feed

Building on High Standards

Hager Companies continues to enhance production capabilities in our Montgomery, AL manufacturing facility. With attention focused on our Threshold and Weatherstrip product line, we have recently introduced new products including the 710S Adhesive Mullion Seal and 900 Series Hospitality series of products. We remain committed to dedicating resources and capital to bring our customers quality products, in the timeframe the marketplace demands.

Further internal improvements have included implementation of upgraded racking systems, a brand new production layout and the execution of new packing lines. We continue to build on the high standards started by Charles Hager over 168 years ago by improving the quality of our products and services.

The new in-house anodizing line and machining center efficiencies that Josh Hager revealed last year at DHI ConNextions are fully functional. The Roton® Continuous Geared hinges are being constructed with simultaneously milled bearing slots with consistent and measurable accuracy. This allows the bearings to seat perfectly and operate smoothly across the entire hinge for the life of the opening.  We will continue striving to reduce lead times and improve quality in order to further support to our valued partners.

More …

RSS Feed

Product Announcements

We’ve had a busy first quarter and we wanted to share our most recent product announcements in case you missed any!

January 8, 2018 – 3300 Series Grade 3
We added the 3300 Series Grade 3 tubular leverset to our lock line. Offered in four functions – passage, privacy, entry and single dummy, along with five finishes: US3, US10B, US15, US26, US26D. It’s field reversible with a thru-bolt design for ease of installation. This Grade 3 lock provides a perfect solution for multi-family and assisted living facilities when suiting with Grade 1 and Grade 2 products.

 

 

More …

RSS Feed

3300 Grade 3 Tubular Latchset

We are pleased to announce the release of our new Grade 3 Lock, 3300 Series. This new series of tubular leverset is BHMA Certified ANSI A156.2 Grade 3 test standards and ADA compliant ANSI A117.1. It’s offered with a 4-way latch, adjustable 2-3/8″ x 2-3/4″ backset and square and round corner faceplates, and is field reversible providing versatility for most retrofit applications.

Available in four lever styles – Archer, August, Johnston and Withnell and four functions – Passage, Single Dummy, Privacy, and Entry; the 3300 Series is a perfect solution for suiting with Grade 1 and Grade 2 Hager products in multi-family, hospitality and assisted living facilities applications.

August lever style – Entry function
Johnston lever style – Entry function

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archer lever style – Passage function
Withnell lever style – Single dummy function

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For additional information about the new 3300 Series please contact your local sales representative or our Customer Service department at 800-255-3590.

 

 

RSS Feed

Welcome 2017!

Happy New Year!

We hope you had a great holiday season and are excited for the new year, we are!

We released a variety of product in 2016, both in our residential and commercial lines and just in case you missed it….

Residential
334V Door Knocker with 115° Viewer – Ideal for multi-family projects the 334V offers a traditional design with an integrated 115° viewer.
1798 Shelf and Support Road – Similar to our 1797 but with a 3″ drop to allow for deeper shelves.
Diamond Plate Flat Goods – In April we started offering our 220S kick plates and A30S push plates with a diamond plate design. These are made to order items.

Commercial
Optional Flush End Cap for our 4500 & 4600 Series exit devices.
Photoluminescent push bar cover option to comply with the IBC Chapter 10 – Means of Egress codes.
ETW & RETW option on the 780-057HD and 780-157 full surface Roton® continuous hinges.
Touchless actuators for our low energy power operators to help control the spread of germs.
Large Format Interchangeable Cores for use in our 3400 & 3800 Series locks and 4500 Series exit devices.
Conestoga Sliding Barn Door Hardware where rustic meets convenience

We couldn’t continue growing without your support, so thank you!  We have exciting plans in 2017 and can’t wait to share them with you.

Wishing you a prosperous and healthy new year!

 

RSS Feed

Case Studies

We are constantly asking our sales representatives for projects that we can use in case studies and project profiles.  With blogs and social media now part of mainstream reading, content marketing has become imperative in order to share your brand and message.

We asked Tess Wittler, an experienced construction marketing professional, to share why case studies are important for our, and your, business and how it isn’t as daunting as one may think to write one. This article was published in November’s issue of the DHI Doors + Hardware Magazine and reprinted with their permission.
__

The Framework for Writing a Compelling Case Study by Tess Wittler

Does hearing the phrase, “We need a case study written on [blank]” make you cringe? If you are like many other architects, engineers and building material manufacturers I’ve worked with, you would rather pluck out every single nose hair one by one than write a case study. For ages, writing a case study in this industry seemed daunting and tiring, and when it was finished, it seemed as if you’d spent all this energy to create a dry, boring marketing piece that would rarely be used.

Not so! Content marketing has transformed how we look at our marketing materials, including case studies. In fact, according to the 2016 B2B Content Marketing Trends – North America study conducted by the Content Marketing Institute / MarketingProfs, 82 percent of those responding said they use case studies as one of their content marketing tactics – second only to social media content (other than blogs).

Yes, despite so many in the building industry recognizing that they need to invest more in their content marketing efforts, many still aren’t – and their lack of energy toward this effort is precisely the opportunity that can catapult your organization ahead of the rest. Case studies are one of the key components to making this happen.

More …

RSS Feed

Texas Society of Architects 2016 Convergence – Booth 229

We’ll be heading down to San Antonio, Texas in a few weeks to exhibit at the 2016 Texas Society of Architects Design Expo. This is one of the premier regional architectural shows in the country. Architects take this show seriously and are extremely generous with their time on the expo hall floor.

Last year we highlighted our new 9400 Series stainless steel sliding barn door hardware. This year, we added the Conestoga to our sliding door hardware line, which is powder coated black aluminum for a rustic appearance. There are four styles of hangers offered; three face-mount and one top-mount. Sliding barn doors continue to be a popular choice with architects and end users. In addition to saving floor space, sliding doors also meet ADA requirements and are easy for people with disabilities to use.

ConestogaPNG

With the Conestoga as the latest addition, we feel our sliding door hardware product line provides a variety of design choices for your architectural needs. Of course, we will have many other product lines on display too.

More …

RSS Feed

Project Profile: Community Education Building, Wilmington Delaware

In its second year, the Great Oaks Charter School is part of a collection of schools that includes Academia Antonia Alonso School and Kuumba Academy. The building was originally a bank, operating as MBNA then Bank of America. It was donated in 2012 by Bank of America to the Longwood Foundation to start the Community Education Building (CEB).

Owner:                                     Community Education Building

Architect:                                  Homsey Architects, Inc.

General Contractor:                 Wohlsen Construction

Distributor:                               Premier Door, Frame and Hardware

Hager Sales Rep. Agency:      Hardware Specialty Group

 

Hager Company Hardware in CBE School in Wilmington DE Oct 2015 credit photograph by Eric Crossan 302-378-1700

 

More …

RSS Feed