School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

In the last 18 years, there have been, unfortunately, many more school shootings.  Mechanical and electronic access control continues to develop to provide safer buildings. Other security measures that have been implemented in many school districts include metal detectors, security cameras, ID badges, visitor management software, limiting entry/exit points, security guards, and much more.  There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution.

We also must not forget that life and fire safety are equally as important as security. Balancing both can be challenging for facilities. Many of the recently introduced classroom barricade devices don’t provide the ability to allow for free egress.  You just have to Google The Iroquois Fire, The Cocoanut Grove Nightclub, The Beverly Hills Supper Club and the Station Nightclub fires to understand why having a clear means of egress is vital to saving lives in case of fire.

Ultimately we wish every school could be equipped with an electronic access control solution that could lock down classrooms and perimeter doors with the touch of a button, but that isn’t financially feasible for many school districts. When we introduced our new electronic access control line, HS4, last year, one of our goals was to provide different levels of security and safety that would fit a range of budgets. To learn more about our HS4 electronic access solutions please contact [email protected].

For more information on the efforts from the security and safety community please click on the links below.

 

 

 

 

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The DSSF / Hager Companies Scholarship Winner!

We have always felt educating the next generation is an important aspect of our business and industry. Offering continuing education to our team members through the Door and Hardware Institute (DHI), the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), among other organizations on key programs related to safety and security issues is another key step.

DHI’s Safety & Security Foundation (DSSF) also encourages and attracts new talent to the industry and gives them the training, tools and education to help them be successful. It was an easy decision to partner with the Foundation and establish the Hager Companies Scholarship.

This year we congratulate Alison Nugent, a senior detailer with DH Pace in Olathe, Kansas as the winner of the Hager Companies Scholarship! Alison answered a few questions DHI put forth to all the winners in November’s issue of Doors + Hardware Magazine and we wanted to share her responses here.

How did you get started in the door and hardware industry?
I returned from a summer internship in the United Kingdom and was looking for a full-time position.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
I enjoy providing a service that helps create functional buildings that meet the needs of people who use them every day. While the industry can be challenging, I enjoy being a technical resource for architects and general contractors.

How do you de-stress?
I de-stress by cleaning and organizing things. I also enjoy exercising and playing sports.

If you weren’t a door security and safety professional, what would you be?
I would work in a position in the sports industry. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I am a big sports fan.

Who is your mentor/hero?
My mentor was my late co-worker Steve Holden. Steve had over 30 years’ experience in this industry and was full of knowledge. He was an incredible resource and person and I am thankful for everything he taught me.

What is your advice to someone considering taking DHI technical education?
The DHI technical education is a big commitment, but worth the effort. While it can seem overwhelming, focus on completing one class at a time. That has helped me stay motivated to achieve my overall goal.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Something that my family, friends, teachers and co-workers have all shared: Do not be afraid to ask questions.” Asking questions demonstrates a desire to learn and grow. I have learned a lot by asking questions and will continue to do that throughout my career.

Congratulations and wishing you continued success Alison! You can read about all the winners on DSSF website here.

 

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Classroom Barricade Devices

We had another post planned but felt this was more important to share.

This video has surfaced on Facebook. It currently has 3,552,279 views, 122,560 shares, 21,189 likes and 1,153 comments.  These are the type of devices that those of us in the hardware industry are fighting against.

Facebook / Future X - via Iframely

 

From the comments it is evident that people don’t understand the dangers these devices can contribute too. If you have a moment we encourage you to comment on the Facebook post to help education the general population.

Here are links to additional information as to why barricade devices are not a good choice.

National Association of State Fire Marshals – Classroom Door Security Guidelines

Partner Alliance for Safer Schools (PASS) – White Paper on Classroom Barricade Devices

Classroom Barricade Devices and why focusing on them makes us vulnerable to threats

Expert says many of these products are not code compliant and could nullify the warrantees of locks and door hardware.

What Price Security?

Classroom Door Security

 

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