Case Study – Two Twelve Clayton

This article appears in the June issue of the Door Security + Safety Magazine.

Two Twelve Clayton – St. Louis’s Largest Multi-Use Project in 30 Years

The City of Clayton is situated just west of St. Louis, Mo., making it a suburb of The Gateway City – but it is much more than that. Clayton is the seat of St. Louis County and the activity in and around the courthouse attracts lawyers, county officials and business leaders to its center on a daily basis.

Clayton’s redevelopment efforts began in the early 1990s with the creation of a Downtown Master Plan, which was revised in 2010. The plan’s introduction states, “Over the last decade, Clayton has experienced significant investment in its central business district, ranging from the Crescent to the Centene Headquarters to the MetroLink stations. With several more projects planned or under construction, Downtown Clayton has become an area with the potential for significant real estate development.”

One such project: Two Twelve Clayton

What is Two Twelve Clayton

Located at 212 S. Meramac Ave., this 26-story, 382,666-square-foot mixed-use building boasts 250 units, the largest multifamily building to be constructed in Clayton in the last 30 years. The first floor houses retail space and amenities for the residents. Intended to mirror a boutique hotel, it includes a 24/7 attended lobby, concierge service, and a business center.

Between the second and fifth floors is secured parking, and Floors 6 through 25 are residential levels with a mix of studio and one-, two- and three- bedroom apartment options. The top level is reserved for amenities such as a resort-style rooftop pool deck with a fire pit, state-of-the-art fitness center, chef’s kitchen and recreation rooms. The building also comes with complimentary high-speed WiFi in all common areas.

As with any project, Two Twelve took time to evolve, “Jack Holleran, president of HDA Architects, got into Clayton’s redevelopment conversations early and began sharing ideas with developers in how to redevelop different areas of the city,” recalls Josh Goodman, AIA, Director of Operations for HDA Architects.

In 2010, CA Ventures and White Oak Realty Partners, both from the greater Chicago area, expressed interest in moving into the St. Louis market and ultimately decided to get involved in Two Twelve Clayton. “It’s a great location,” says Goodman. “It’s close to Shaw Park and the Metro line and within walking distance to a variety of restaurants, shops, and a grocery store.”

Because a few national corporations such as Centene Corporation and Enterprise Rent-a-Car call Clayton home, the original thought was that Two Twelve Clayton would attract young professionals to live there. But what HDA Architects found as a pleasant surprise was that there were families interested in living in apartments, too. Goodman noted that the three-bedroom apartments were some of the first to be rented out when units became available in August 2017.

“There’s a mix of singles and married couples with young children already living there,” he said.

Construction Challenges

Two Twelve is positioned on the corner of a busy thoroughfare within the city, and this urban setting presented a host of construction challenges, including site access for material deliveries and construction activity – which meant they needed to be creative. An old police station adjacent to the site was used as the job site office instead of a trailer, and the contractor was able to store the materials needed early on there, as well.

“To address the tight, urban setting, our contractor put together a game plan to sequence deliveries throughout the project, and once we got the garage built, we were able to use that space for storage,” explains Goodman.

Consulting on Hardware Selection and Installation
Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT, Senior Architectural Specifications Consultant with Hager Companies, joined the Two Twelve Clayton project early on. “We reviewed the project before specifications were written to determine what hardware was needed and where,” she said. She noted that “walking around the project on paper” with the architect is the best way to understand the project and what the owners want. “Otherwise, we are just making assumptions,” Simon added.

“This project was interesting to me says Goodman, “because I’d never done a high-rise project before, and I learned a lot through this process. Stair towers in a 26-story building are much different than they are in a four-story office building and they require different types of door hardware. Sheryl got into the details with me to help me understand what was needed where and why.”

To meet fire code, one of the requirements was to design a lobby at the elevator bank with doors so that in the event of a fire, that area could be sectioned off.

“As architects, we wanted to make the doors as ‘invisible’ as possible. We worked with Sheryl on concepts to design doors that functioned to satisfy code requirements, yet were the least disruptive to the design,” noted Goodman.

During the specification process, Simon helped Goodman identify the door hardware needs for all 26 floors – both for commercial and residential spaces. One feature the building’s owner wanted was electronic card readers.

“She helped me understand how the card readers can be programmed to interact throughout the building – so one card can open their apartment and also provide access to exterior doors, storage areas, the elevator and common areas,” said Goodman.

Coordination between the hardware supplier, who was awarded the project for interior doors of all 250 residential units and the first-floor commercial spaces, and Hager was made easier because of Simon’s involvement on the front-end of the project with the architect.

“A high-rise mixed-use project, such as Two Twelve Clayton, is incredibly complex because there are various building codes that need to be followed,” explained Simon. Currently, the state of Missouri has adopted the 2012 version of the International Building Code (IBC) which incorporates NFPA 70 (National Electrical Code), NFPA 80 (Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives), and ACC A117.1-2017 (Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities), to name a few.

“Hager thoroughly enjoys being a part of these types of projects where we work in tandem with architectural firms to ensure that the door hardware specified not only meets the owner’s vision for the project but also meets all state and local code requirements,” Simon concluded.+

by Ginny Powell, Product Marketing Specialist for Hager Companies

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School Security and Safety since Columbine

18 years ago the Columbine school shooting shook the world with images of students filing out of school buildings in single file with hands raised, SWAT teams surrounding the school, and the stark terror on the faces of the students and teachers. For the security and safety community, it renewed efforts to keep our most cherished citizens safe.

School security has increased tremendously since the Columbine tragedy. A direct result was the introduction of the classroom security function. In order to secure a traditional classroom function lock, a person had to step out into the hallway from the classroom and use a key to secure the door opening. With the introduction of the classroom security function, the lock is able to be secured from the interior of the room.

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The Geared Continuous Hinge: Solutions and Applications by Ginny Powell

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue.

While you may not give hinges much thought, they actually hold up as one of the greatest inventions of mankind back so far that archeologists aren’t sure of its exact origin. In fact, bronze hinges date back to ancient times, found in societies in Africa and Asia, as well as Europe.

In the United States, as Easterners began pouring into St. Louis in the late 1840s and early 1850s to make their westward journey, Charles Hager was building his business by providing wagon wheels and hardware for Conestoga wagons. This made Hager an active part of the new frontier in the development of hinges as we know them today.

In commercial, educational and institutional facilities, doors are hung using one of three hinge types: standard (conventional) hinges, continuous hinges or pivots – and it is the continuous hinge, with its intermeshing gears and thrust bearings, that is the far superior choice in many high use applications.

The Continuous Hinge

There are two types of continuous hinges—the pin-and-barrel and the geared. The pin-and-barrel continuous hinge (sometimes known as the piano hinge) has two leaves joined together by a pin. The geared continuous hinge features gear teeth that mesh together under a cap that runs the length of the door.

The geared continuous hinge was patented in 1963 by Austin Baer, and in 1968 he earned a second patent for adding thrust bearing to his original design, known as the Roton® Continuous Geared Hinge. The patent expired in 1985, and Hager Companies purchased Baer’s company in 1989.

“There were situations in facilities with high-abuse door openings where we knew a standard butt hinge wasn’t the best choice. We were intrigued by the Roton® continuous hinge and how it distributed the weight over the length of the door,” explains Warren Hager Executive Vice President & Assistant Secretary for Hager Companies. “We purchased The Baer Company because we felt the product was a perfect fit with the quality Hager was known for and it allowed us to bring additional value and solutions to our customers.”

Today every major U.S. commercial hardware manufacturer offers a line of continuous hinges.

Benefits of a Continuous Hinge

While continuous hinges are not as commonly used as standard hinges, there are several solid reasons for choosing a continuous hinge over another hanging device:

• Continuous hinges extend the full length of the door, which means they distribute the door’s weight evenly to the frame. This reduces the amount of stress to the doorframe when compared to using a standard or pivot hinge.
• Because a continuous hinge is secured to the full height of the opening, a continuous hinge keeps the door in constant alignment, eliminating the chance of a sagging door.
• Additionally, continuous hinges also help reduce the chance of wood doors from warping, which is especially helpful when the door opening is three-and-a-half or four-feet wide.
• Continuous hinges also remove the gap between the door and the frame, and this absence of the gap helps prevent fingers from being pinched, which means a safer door. This safety makes a continuous hinge a natural choice for doors where children are present.

Those are the exact reasons Jeff Chan, locksmith with Mercy Hospital, changed the specifications for the hospital and now requires continuous geared hinges on all doors over three-feet wide. “Installing continuous geared hinges on door openings over three feet in width decreases future issues, saving us time and money,” he says.

Smart Applications for a Continuous Hinge

These characteristics mean that continuous hinges are often installed for openings that are subject to high traffic and abuse, such as gymnasiums, health care facilities and sports complexes. “As the population continues to grow, the demand on door openings increases with security and safety at the forefront,” explains Dan White, Manager of Product Development for Hager Companies. “For these high-demand openings, the continuous geared hinge remains the smartest choice for the life of an opening.”

Here are a few examples of where you can install a continuous hinge:

HOSPITALS, STADIUMS ARENAS, AND SCHOOL GYMNASIUMS
Over time, the doors that get a lot of use also tend to “come off their hinges” and sag or warp. Because a continuous hinge runs the length of the door, it keeps the door in constant alignment and eliminates this issue.

PRISONS AND BACK DOOR TO CONVENIENCE STORES AND STRIP MALLS
A geared continuous hinge can keep a building even more secure than a standard hinge because there isn’t a pin that can be removed. In fact, prying off a continuous hinge would be time-consuming – which acts as a deterrent.

STOREFRONTS
Doors allow air to escape, which can be a great source of energy loss when trying to warm or cool the air (depending on the time of year). A continuous hinge helps close the gap between the door and the frame – creating a tighter seal.

One example where a continuous hinge solved a recurring door problem was at a St. Louis university hospital radiology treatment room. The doors were four by seven feet (lined in ¼” lead) and hung on heavy duty pivot hinges with an intermediate pivot. The bottom pin on the floor pivot broke twice, and as a result, the room was rendered unusable. This cost the hospital about $24,000 a day in lost revenue, not to mention the delay in treatment for patients.

“The late Richard Mehaffy, CAHC, a distributor, reached out to me to discuss the issue. After conferring with the technical department at Hager, we recommended installing a Roton® continuous lead lined aluminum hinge designed specifically for doors up to 1,200 pounds. This solved the problem immediately and we never got a call back again,” explained Bud Wilson, President of Horizon Marketing Group.

Continuous hinges are generally available in five standard lengths: 79, 83, 85, 95, and 119 inches, and can be cut to the exact length needed during the installation process (varies by manufacturer). With the frequent use of electronic locks today, continuous hinges can also be modified for concealed electric through-wires, exposed electric switches, and electric power transfers.

Though continuous hinges are not as commonly used as their standard counterpart, they are a financially smart solution. They are durable, long-lasting and solid, which allows for an extended life for the total door opening.

 

Ginny Powell, is a Product Marketing Specialist. She can be reached at [email protected]

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Access Control: Door Hardware and Code Compliance by Brian Clarke DHT, AHC, CDT, CSI

This article was published in the DHI, Door Security + Safety Magazine in January 2018 issue

Keeping occupants safe is a common goal for facility managers and property owners. As the number of break-ins, active shooter incidents and other violent encounters continue to grow, controlling who enters a building has become more vital than ever before.

For healthcare, education and office buildings, standard door and key configurations do not always provide the type of security necessary. This is leading decision-makers to look at more sophisticated access control solutions. The electronic access control market has become more refined in recent years and it is important to know what is available and what may fit the needs of a given facility. Furthermore, the type of hardware chosen must be code-compliant, making proper selection even more important.

In high use buildings, such as a school or office building, access control must allow for a door opening to have free means of egress, during an emergency, along with fire protection and meet accessibility requirements. The International Building Code (IBC) defines an accessible means of egress as a “continued and unobstructed way of egress travel from any point in a building or facility that provides an accessible route to an area of refuge, a horizontal exit or a public way.”

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Case Studies

We are constantly asking our sales representatives for projects that we can use in case studies and project profiles.  With blogs and social media now part of mainstream reading, content marketing has become imperative in order to share your brand and message.

We asked Tess Wittler, an experienced construction marketing professional, to share why case studies are important for our, and your, business and how it isn’t as daunting as one may think to write one. This article was published in November’s issue of the DHI Doors + Hardware Magazine and reprinted with their permission.
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The Framework for Writing a Compelling Case Study by Tess Wittler

Does hearing the phrase, “We need a case study written on [blank]” make you cringe? If you are like many other architects, engineers and building material manufacturers I’ve worked with, you would rather pluck out every single nose hair one by one than write a case study. For ages, writing a case study in this industry seemed daunting and tiring, and when it was finished, it seemed as if you’d spent all this energy to create a dry, boring marketing piece that would rarely be used.

Not so! Content marketing has transformed how we look at our marketing materials, including case studies. In fact, according to the 2016 B2B Content Marketing Trends – North America study conducted by the Content Marketing Institute / MarketingProfs, 82 percent of those responding said they use case studies as one of their content marketing tactics – second only to social media content (other than blogs).

Yes, despite so many in the building industry recognizing that they need to invest more in their content marketing efforts, many still aren’t – and their lack of energy toward this effort is precisely the opportunity that can catapult your organization ahead of the rest. Case studies are one of the key components to making this happen.

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The DSSF / Hager Companies Scholarship Winner!

We have always felt educating the next generation is an important aspect of our business and industry. Offering continuing education to our team members through the Door and Hardware Institute (DHI), the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), among other organizations on key programs related to safety and security issues is another key step.

DHI’s Safety & Security Foundation (DSSF) also encourages and attracts new talent to the industry and gives them the training, tools and education to help them be successful. It was an easy decision to partner with the Foundation and establish the Hager Companies Scholarship.

This year we congratulate Alison Nugent, a senior detailer with DH Pace in Olathe, Kansas as the winner of the Hager Companies Scholarship! Alison answered a few questions DHI put forth to all the winners in November’s issue of Doors + Hardware Magazine and we wanted to share her responses here.

How did you get started in the door and hardware industry?
I returned from a summer internship in the United Kingdom and was looking for a full-time position.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
I enjoy providing a service that helps create functional buildings that meet the needs of people who use them every day. While the industry can be challenging, I enjoy being a technical resource for architects and general contractors.

How do you de-stress?
I de-stress by cleaning and organizing things. I also enjoy exercising and playing sports.

If you weren’t a door security and safety professional, what would you be?
I would work in a position in the sports industry. I grew up playing a lot of sports and I am a big sports fan.

Who is your mentor/hero?
My mentor was my late co-worker Steve Holden. Steve had over 30 years’ experience in this industry and was full of knowledge. He was an incredible resource and person and I am thankful for everything he taught me.

What is your advice to someone considering taking DHI technical education?
The DHI technical education is a big commitment, but worth the effort. While it can seem overwhelming, focus on completing one class at a time. That has helped me stay motivated to achieve my overall goal.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Something that my family, friends, teachers and co-workers have all shared: Do not be afraid to ask questions.” Asking questions demonstrates a desire to learn and grow. I have learned a lot by asking questions and will continue to do that throughout my career.

Congratulations and wishing you continued success Alison! You can read about all the winners on DSSF website here.

 

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Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark

This article was published in the August edition of the DHI Door + Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with permission.

Come Two by Two. A Look Inside Noah’s Ark, by Ginny Powell

Tucked into the “All American City” of Lakeland, Florida, is not just a community, but the realization of a dream initiated by a small group of parents nearly 20 years ago. It’s called The Village at Noah’s Landing.

Nearly two decades ago, a small group of parents of adult children with special needs met while watching their children take part in sporting activities. They began talking with each other about what would happen to their kids if they were no longer around. Who would oversee their care?

Their worries were further reinforced when they discovered that the options for care in and around Lakeland were extremely limited. But instead of becoming defeated, these five sets of parents took action. Big action. In 1997, they created Noah’s Ark of Central Florida.

The first homes were built between 2002 and 2007 and are located near downtown Lakeland. Called Noah’s Nest, this clustering of four houses is home to 17 residents living independently with the support of their fellow residents, family, and friends.

Noah June 2016 -10

A Dream of Building a Community
While Noah’s Nest was a great start, the dream was always to build a bigger community for adults with developmental disabilities. The Villages of Noah’s Landing, with Phase 1 scheduled to open later this summer, is precisely that.

Phase 1 can accommodate up to 132 developmentally disabled residents and only takes up a fraction of the property’s 62 acres. When all phases are complete, the community will offer a wide selection of social, recreational, educational and vocational choices, and provide for the health care needs of its residents.

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Keeping Patients Safe Through Life Safety Hardware by Jill Gile, CSI, CDT

Jill Gile is the newest member of Commencement Bay Architectural Group, a manufacturers’ sales agency that represent’s Hager in the Pacific Northwest. She has jumped into the hardware industry with a big splash including recently passing her CDT exam.

This is an article she wrote for the June Edition of the DHI Doors & Hardware Magazine and reprinted here with both Jill’s & DHI’s permission.

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Humans are a reactive species. We tend to carry on with a standard mode of operation until an emergency tells us that we might have to change our ways. This holds true for many aspects of our lives, personal and professional. It might be as simple as changing eating habits to as big as the Titanic creating laws about lifeboat requirements.

For the construction industry, unfortunately, we are faced with Titanic-level issues of life safety. Rules regarding fire codes and ADA accessibility issues are some of the main examples of changes the industry has had to face.

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DHI Faces – Johnston Hager

Johnston Hager, Director Residential Sales & Marketing, is the DHI Face for this month’s Door & Hardware Magazine.  We are proud of Johnston’s accomplishments and look forward to working with him to continue to grow the Hager brand.

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Johnston_Hager_Family_Portraits_0715_006

DHI MEMBER SINCE:  2010, but it seems like since birth!

OCCUPATION:  Director of Residential Sales and Marketing

CHILDHOOD AMBITION:  Be a professional golfer … schlepplin’ hardware on the side.

FIRST JOB:  Working as a merchandiser for an Anheuser Busch distributor. In other words, stocking the beer shelves in multiple grocery stores every day.

WHAT LED YOU TO OUR INDUSTRY:  The five generations of Hagers before me!

PROUDEST PROFESSIONAL MOMENT:  For a family member to work at Hager Companies, we have a policy that you must work outside of the business for a minimum of three years. I hated this rule at the time, but I know it helped shape who I am today and am very grateful for the policy.

BIGGEST CHALLENGE:  Being a sixth generation family member in the business, you feel quite a bit of pressure. Thankfully I have two of my first cousins – Josh Hager and August Hager – here every day and we make a great team. Communication is the key. We are all so busy but at least three times a week the family has lunch together and we’re always discussing how we can grow the business.

GUILTY PLEASURE: Golf and fly fishing

MENTOR/HERO:  Other than my mom, Carol, my dad, Ralph, and my wife, Amanda, I would have to say that the late Eric Klein was a key mentor when I began my career at Hager. I miss him every day.

BEST ADVICE YOU EVER RECEIVED:  If you are unsure, don’t be afraid to say “I don’t know.”

BEST ADVICE YOU NEVER RECEIVED:  Customer are not interruptions of our work; they are the reason for it.

HOW HAS YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH DHI SUPPORTED YOUR CAREER?:  DHI is a great resource for education and professional networking. The annual conNextions show also provides an opportunity for me to meet and speak with our customers one on one, which is important to understand how we best can serve them.

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Johnston, along with his cousins, August and Josh, and his dad, Ralph, will be at DHI conNextions in Orlando this year. Stop by Booth 431 to say hello.

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The Growing Popularity of Sliding Doors by Ginny Powell

This article was published in the January issue of the Door & Hardware Magazine, a publication of The Door and Hardware Institute and reprinted here with DHI’s permission.

You don’t have to look far to notice the popularity of sliding doors and sliding barn-style doors. This trend is hitting the commercial and residential markets with gusto, and according to the experts we spoke to, the movement will continue to climb with no sign of letting up in the coming years.

While the use of sliding doors has steadily increased each year, the emerging trend itself is more about the expansion of use – how designers are finding new ways to integrate them into spaces.

This growth has also sparked a revolution in door and hardware manufacturing to meet the growing demand. For example, just a few years ago, a sliding barn-style door needed to be custom designed and built, but today the number of pre-fabricated doors on the market continues to rise. Accompanying hardware is evolving as well, offering many more finishes, styles and durability options – giving architects and designers a nice variety from which to choose.

Up until recently, the most common applications for sliding doors included healthcare and office spaces. While those segments are still strong, sliding doors are replacing traditional ones in several new areas.


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