Team Member Profile – Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT – Manager, Architectural Specification Consultants

Sheryl Simon has been with Hager Companies for 13 years and was recently promoted to Manager, Architectural Specifications Consultants. We sat down with Sheryl to ask her a few questions.

Sheryl Simon at one of the many CSI STL events she volunteers for. Sheryl currently is 2nd VP for the chapter. Photo credit: George Everding

Childhood AmbitionI was always interested in design. (I’m not sure if it’s an ambition or an obsession.) Even as a young child I was always re-arranging the furniture. My parents never knew what to expect when they came home. 

First JobWorking at a very busy ice cream stand. The lines seemed to never end but it was fun interacting with all the customers. 

What led you to the hardware industry: I married into it and very quickly became a hardware geek. 

Proudest professional momentWhen I passed my CDT. It is a very difficult exam and required a lot of studying. 

 

Sheryl Simon and August Hager – Jobsite visit at Ballpark Village

Biggest challengeMy biggest challenge today is keeping up with technology, particularly the advances in electronic access control. 

Guilty pleasureChocolate and home decor stores.

Favorite book/movieMy favorite movie is “It’s a Wonderful Life”. It reminds me that our life’s most important work is often work we never planned to do. 

 

Sheryl sharing her knowledge at the inaugural Young Professionals Day tour in 2015 at CSI CONSTRUCT – St. Louis

Mentor/heroI have had many mentors over the years and I am thankful for all of them. 

Best advice you ever received: When one door closes another one opens. It’s a pun on the industry but very appropriate. 

Sheryl receiving congratulations for her Hager Companies 10-year anniversary

Best advise you never receivedTrust your instincts.

What advice you would share with someone entering this industry:  The construction industry is one of the most exciting and diverse industries. It is forever changing so never stop learning and be receptive to change. If it’s something you want to pursue go for it! I’m glad I did. 

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We reached out to a few of Sheryl’s colleagues and this is what they had to say.

“Sheryl is the go-to person for many architects and this can be contributed to her attention to detail and the fact she genuinely cares about the specification process and everyone involved in it. Sheryl is determined to hold herself to a higher standard and expects more from herself than others expect from her. Being meticulous and keeping information organized allows Sheryl to provide the very best service to her clients. She also has a wonderful outlook on life and somehow always finds something to laugh about, even when things may be going a bit sideways.”
Brian Clarke, AHC, DHT, DHC, FDAI, AAADM, CDT, CSI – Director, Architectural Specifications & Technical Support

From the Two Twelve Clayton Case Study
“This project was interesting to me because I’d never done a high-rise project before, and I learned a lot through the process. Stair towers in a 26-story building are much different than they are in a four-story office building and they require different types of hardware. Sheryl got into the details with me to help me understand what was needed and why. As architects, we wanted to make the doors as ‘invisible’ as possible. We worked with Sheryl on concepts to design doors that functioned to satisfy code requirements, yet were the least disruptive to the design.”
Josh Goodman, AIA, Director of Operations, HDA Architects

 

If you’re located in the Midwest and need help with specifications, door submittals or would like to schedule a lunch and learn, please contact Sheryl at [email protected] 

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Why is the Bottom Rod Missing?

Have you ever come across a pair of doors that have just a top vertical rod exit device and not top and bottom, and wondered why? Often an architect or specification writer will specify “less bottom rod (LBR)” on pairs of doors, especially in healthcare facilities.

This photo was taken in an assisted living facility here in St. Louis. This opening is a pair of fire rated corridor doors which means they must positively latch in case of a fire to control flames and smoke from traveling through the facility. Without latching hardware on the exit device itself, positive latching is accomplished with the surface mounted top vertical rod. As you can see from the picture, the door is being held open with a magnetic hold open tied into the fire alarm. If the fire alarm is activated the hold open will release the door. The door closer will swing the door shut and the top vertical rod will latch the door.

This leads us to the question of why the architect or specification writer specified LBR. While the top and bottom vertical rods help secure the door, the bottom vertical rod is secured to a floor strike mounted in the floor. That floor strike can become a tripping hazard to people that use mobility devices, such as canes, walkers, crutches, and wheelchairs. ADA regulation 404.2.10, Door and Gate Surfaces, states: “Swing door and gate surfaces within 10 inches (255mm) of the finish floor or ground measured vertically shall have a smooth surface on the push side extending the full width of the door or gate.” The regulation goes on to specify how thick protection plates and installation screws can be.

This installation is a textbook example of the intersection of fire code and ADA regulations. The goal is to keep people safe both from fire and tripping. When architects and door hardware professionals work together, the result can be a safe, attractive and code compliant facility.

For assistance in writing door hardware specifications please contact Brian Clarke at [email protected]. For information regarding our products please contact our customer service team at 800-255-3590 or your local sales representative.

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Thankfulness

As we head into Thanksgiving later this week, we want to share our gratitude for the Hager family, our colleagues and leadership teams, sales and architectural representatives, our customers, architects, end-users, vendors, and suppliers, all of which are an important part of our family.

Charles Hager expanded the business based on relationships built on transparency. We continue that transparency 169 years later by providing quality products while striving to be a collaborating participant with our channel partners. We work hard to bring opportunities that turn into long-term business to our customers. We write true non-proprietary specifications while focusing on being correct, clear, concise, and complete for our architects.  Our team of experts is available at the beginning of the project to assist in the coordination of the door hardware and confirm each door opening meets building codes.

Next year we celebrate 170 years in business. To honor this tremendous achievement, we’re holding a contest through our desktop calendar to collect your favorite Hager story. Whether it’s an interaction you had with an employee, an organizational milestone, or just a fun walk down memory lane. One winner will be selected each month at random. All entries will be displayed at www/hagerco.com/contest for everyone to enjoy.

We are thankful to have such strong relationships throughout the channel and wish each one of you a wonderful Thanksgiving.

 

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Just 7 Weeks Before the End … of 2018

It’s almost the end of the year so we wanted to take this opportunity to sweep up a few housekeeping items – learning credits and marketing funds.

Learning Credits

Are you, or anyone you know, scrambling to finish up learning credits before the end of the year?  We offer several one-hour continuing education AIA/CES courses. Check out our brochure here.

Access Control 101 | 1.0 LU/HSW
This course defines the differences between access control “head-end” systems and traditional (metal cut keys) key replacement systems. We will review the different types of credentials (metal keys, card keys, fobs, etc) as well as battery operated products vs. fully hard-wired electrified locking systems. Lastly, we will teach you the do’s and don’ts for code compliance.

ADA: Meeting Accessibility Standards for Openings | 1.0 LU/HSW
This course features an overview of compliance with ADA, physical disabilities, and ANSI A117.1 Chapter 404 for doors, doorways, and gates. We will also discuss approach dimensions compliances.

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Safe Schools Week October 21-27, 2018

Every week is safe schools week in our book, but in1984 the National School Safety Center (NSSC) designated a special week to recognize the successes of quintessential school, district, state, and national programs.

Per the NSSC website, the goal of this campaign is to “motivate key education and law enforcement policymakers, as well as students, parents and community residents, to vigorously advocate school safety. School safety includes keeping campuses free from crime and violence, improving discipline, and increasing student attendance.”

Doors, with the correct hardware, play an essential role in providing safety and security to students, teachers, and personnel. Have you ever thought about how many doors you walk through when you enter a school? Was there an open gate when you entered the campus? Was the building’s perimeter door unlocked, so you were able to walk right in? How many doors did you pass before you reached the office?  Recently constructed schools are designed to direct the flow of visitors to help control access to the campus. Often, older schools were built to be more accessible, allowing opportunities for non-authorized people to enter freely, without having visitors check-in.

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SCIP and CONSTRUCT – 2018

Next week, several members of the Hager team will be heading to Long Beach, California for the annual Specifications Consultants in Independent Practice meeting, better known as SCIP, and the CONSTRUCT Education and Exhibits show.

We always have a great time at both events and it gives us a chance to chat with specification writers to learn how we can better help their processes and solve any pain points.

CONSTRUCT 2014 – Baltimore

Our complete line of door hardware falls under one brand, the Hager brand, and we take pride in writing true non-proprietary specifications.  We focus on being correct, clear, concise and complete to make sure all parties in the channel understand how each door opening is expected to function before it’s installed.

SCIP Members Touring Hager HQ – CONSTRUCT 2015 – St. Louis

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Proposition 65

California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, commonly known as Proposition 65 or “Prop 65”, was voted into effect by California’s voters in 1986. The goal of this California law is to protect the state’s drinking water sources from toxic substances known to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm by prohibiting businesses from knowingly discharging these substances into drinking water sources or onto land from where the substances can pass into drinking water sources. The law also prohibits businesses from knowingly exposing individuals to these substances without providing a warning.

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) administers the Proposition 65 program. OEHHA, which is part of the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA), determines whether chemicals meet the scientific and legal requirements for placement on the Proposition 65 list, and administers regulations that govern warnings and other aspects of Prop 65.

Chemicals are added or removed annually from the official list of toxic substances based on California’s analysis of current scientific information. The California Proposition 65 List currently contains more than 950 substances. The latest list can be downloaded at http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/newlist.html

Hager Companies is committed to providing safe and compliant products for our customers. Our goal is to continually work with our vendors, supply chain partners, and resellers to source responsibly and to comply with regulatory and reporting requirements, including providing product warnings to our customers as required by laws like Proposition 65.

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Project Profile: The Abilene Wylie ISD Performing Arts Center – Abilene, Texas

Construction began on the new $11.6 million performing arts center in the Spring of 2018.  Initially, electronic access control wasn’t included in the original bid, but the school district decided to add additional security measures after the project broke ground. Adding electronic access control to a construction project after it has begun could cause major scope shift, but with the Hager powered by Salto HS4 system, it wasn’t as difficult as one would think.

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Locking Down School Safety and Access Control by Gordon Holmes

This article appears in the July issue of the DHI Security + Safety Magazine and is reprinted here with their permission.

Locking Down School Safety and Access Control

According to a recent CNN article, In the first 20 weeks of 2018 there have been 22 school shootings where someone was hurt or killed.  This averages out to more than one shooting a week, so it’s no surprise that school security is a growing focus of today’s world.

Since 1999 when the Columbine shooting happened, towns such as Sandy Hook, Connecticut, Blacksburg, Virginia, and more recently Parkland, Florida -are forever etched in our minds because of the senseless violence that occurred there. While we recognize we cannot entirely prevent violence, campuses across America are learning that they can proactively seek solutions to greatly reduce the likelihood of it.

As door and hardware industry experts, it is our responsibility to educate those who make decisions on access points – from school teachers to officials, and from general contractors to architects who make the design and material decisions. It’s our goal to be at the table as early as possible to educate decision makers on their options – and the impact of those options.

Lockdown with Access Control
Lockdown is the ability to prevent access to a segment or segments of a building or the entire facility for security measures. In the school environment, the lockdown can be as small as a classroom or as broad as the entire campus. In addition, the speed of the lockdown is critical and how quickly lockdown is achieved depends on the system installed.

“In the case of access control in a school environment, the first question you should ask is, ‘How do you want your lockdown to work?'” advised James Stokes, Vice-President of Access Controls for Hager Companies.

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Lift for Life Academy

Each project we work on is unique in some fashion. Sometimes though, a project comes along that touches the heart and with it the realization there is an opportunity to assist and support beyond delivering quality products and outstanding service. Such a project and story came along in 2010 for Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT, our Senior Architectural Specifications Consultant.

In her role as Hager’s architectural specification consultant, Sheryl was approached by a local architect to generate a specification for a small school renovation. “After visiting Lift for Life Academy (LFLA), meeting the principal, the students and hearing their stories I felt compelled to reach out to help the school in any way possible,” said Simon. Describing the situation at the school to the Hager family, Sheryl said, “Without hesitation, the family offered to donate the door hardware.”

LFLA became the first independent charter middle school to open in the City of St. Louis in 2000. It was established to “provide an education to middle school students” and is sponsored by Southeast Missouri State University. The first senior class graduated in 2012 and currently, the school serves 580 students in grades 6-12.

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