Case Study – Two Twelve Clayton

This article appears in the June issue of the Door Security + Safety Magazine.

Two Twelve Clayton – St. Louis’s Largest Multi-Use Project in 30 Years

The City of Clayton is situated just west of St. Louis, Mo., making it a suburb of The Gateway City – but it is much more than that. Clayton is the seat of St. Louis County and the activity in and around the courthouse attracts lawyers, county officials and business leaders to its center on a daily basis.

Clayton’s redevelopment efforts began in the early 1990s with the creation of a Downtown Master Plan, which was revised in 2010. The plan’s introduction states, “Over the last decade, Clayton has experienced significant investment in its central business district, ranging from the Crescent to the Centene Headquarters to the MetroLink stations. With several more projects planned or under construction, Downtown Clayton has become an area with the potential for significant real estate development.”

One such project: Two Twelve Clayton

What is Two Twelve Clayton

Located at 212 S. Meramac Ave., this 26-story, 382,666-square-foot mixed-use building boasts 250 units, the largest multifamily building to be constructed in Clayton in the last 30 years. The first floor houses retail space and amenities for the residents. Intended to mirror a boutique hotel, it includes a 24/7 attended lobby, concierge service, and a business center.

Between the second and fifth floors is secured parking, and Floors 6 through 25 are residential levels with a mix of studio and one-, two- and three- bedroom apartment options. The top level is reserved for amenities such as a resort-style rooftop pool deck with a fire pit, state-of-the-art fitness center, chef’s kitchen and recreation rooms. The building also comes with complimentary high-speed WiFi in all common areas.

As with any project, Two Twelve took time to evolve, “Jack Holleran, president of HDA Architects, got into Clayton’s redevelopment conversations early and began sharing ideas with developers in how to redevelop different areas of the city,” recalls Josh Goodman, AIA, Director of Operations for HDA Architects.

In 2010, CA Ventures and White Oak Realty Partners, both from the greater Chicago area, expressed interest in moving into the St. Louis market and ultimately decided to get involved in Two Twelve Clayton. “It’s a great location,” says Goodman. “It’s close to Shaw Park and the Metro line and within walking distance to a variety of restaurants, shops, and a grocery store.”

Because a few national corporations such as Centene Corporation and Enterprise Rent-a-Car call Clayton home, the original thought was that Two Twelve Clayton would attract young professionals to live there. But what HDA Architects found as a pleasant surprise was that there were families interested in living in apartments, too. Goodman noted that the three-bedroom apartments were some of the first to be rented out when units became available in August 2017.

“There’s a mix of singles and married couples with young children already living there,” he said.

Construction Challenges

Two Twelve is positioned on the corner of a busy thoroughfare within the city, and this urban setting presented a host of construction challenges, including site access for material deliveries and construction activity – which meant they needed to be creative. An old police station adjacent to the site was used as the job site office instead of a trailer, and the contractor was able to store the materials needed early on there, as well.

“To address the tight, urban setting, our contractor put together a game plan to sequence deliveries throughout the project, and once we got the garage built, we were able to use that space for storage,” explains Goodman.

Consulting on Hardware Selection and Installation
Sheryl Simon, CSI, CDT, Senior Architectural Specifications Consultant with Hager Companies, joined the Two Twelve Clayton project early on. “We reviewed the project before specifications were written to determine what hardware was needed and where,” she said. She noted that “walking around the project on paper” with the architect is the best way to understand the project and what the owners want. “Otherwise, we are just making assumptions,” Simon added.

“This project was interesting to me says Goodman, “because I’d never done a high-rise project before, and I learned a lot through this process. Stair towers in a 26-story building are much different than they are in a four-story office building and they require different types of door hardware. Sheryl got into the details with me to help me understand what was needed where and why.”

To meet fire code, one of the requirements was to design a lobby at the elevator bank with doors so that in the event of a fire, that area could be sectioned off.

“As architects, we wanted to make the doors as ‘invisible’ as possible. We worked with Sheryl on concepts to design doors that functioned to satisfy code requirements, yet were the least disruptive to the design,” noted Goodman.

During the specification process, Simon helped Goodman identify the door hardware needs for all 26 floors – both for commercial and residential spaces. One feature the building’s owner wanted was electronic card readers.

“She helped me understand how the card readers can be programmed to interact throughout the building – so one card can open their apartment and also provide access to exterior doors, storage areas, the elevator and common areas,” said Goodman.

Coordination between the hardware supplier, who was awarded the project for interior doors of all 250 residential units and the first-floor commercial spaces, and Hager was made easier because of Simon’s involvement on the front-end of the project with the architect.

“A high-rise mixed-use project, such as Two Twelve Clayton, is incredibly complex because there are various building codes that need to be followed,” explained Simon. Currently, the state of Missouri has adopted the 2012 version of the International Building Code (IBC) which incorporates NFPA 70 (National Electrical Code), NFPA 80 (Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives), and ACC A117.1-2017 (Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities), to name a few.

“Hager thoroughly enjoys being a part of these types of projects where we work in tandem with architectural firms to ensure that the door hardware specified not only meets the owner’s vision for the project but also meets all state and local code requirements,” Simon concluded.+

by Ginny Powell, Product Marketing Specialist for Hager Companies